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Influence of Time to Change's social marketing interventions on stigma in England 2009-2011

  • Sara Evans-Lacko (a1), Estelle Malcolm (a1), Keon West (a2), Diana Rose (a3), Jillian London (a3), Nicolas Rüsch (a4), Kirsty Little (a3), Claire Henderson (a3) and Graham Thornicroft (a3)...
Abstract
Background

England's Time To Change (TTC) social marketing campaign emphasised social contact between people with and without mental health problems to reduce stigma and discrimination.

Aims

We aimed to assess the effectiveness of the mass media component and also that of the mass social contact events.

Method

Online interviews were performed before and after each burst of mass media social marketing to evaluate changes in knowledge, attitudes and behaviour and associations between campaign awareness and outcomes. Participants at social contact events were asked about the occurrence and quality of contact, attitudes, readiness to discuss mental health and intended behaviour towards people with mental health problems.

Results

Prompted campaign awareness was 38-64%. A longitudinal improvement was noted for one intended behaviour item but not for knowledge or attitudes. Campaign awareness was positively associated with greater knowledge (β = 0.80, 95% CI 0.52-1.08) and more favourable attitudes (commonality OR 1.37, 95% CI 1.10-1.70; dangerousness OR 1.41, 95% CI 1.22-1.63) and intended behaviour (β = 0.75, 95% CI 0.53-0.96). Social contact at events demonstrated a positive impact (M=2.68) v. no contact (M = 2.42) on perceived attitude change; t(211)= 3.30, P=0.001. Contact quality predicted more positive attitude change (r=0.33, P<0.01) and greater confidence to challenge stigma (r=0.38, P<0.01).

Conclusions

The favourable short-term consequences of the social marketing campaign suggest that social contact can be used by anti-stigma programmes to reduce stigma.

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Copyright
Royal College of Psychiatrists, This paper accords with the NIH Public Access policy and is governed by the licence available athttp://www.rcpsych.ac.uk/pdf/NIH%20licence%20agreement.pdf
Corresponding author
Dr Claire Henderson, Health Service and Population Research Department, Institute of Psychiatry, PO Box 29, De Crespigny Park, London SE5 8AF, UK. Email: Claire.1.henderson@kcl.ac.uk
Footnotes
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Declaration of interest

G.T. has received grants for stigma-related research in the past 5 years from Lundbeck UK and from the National institute for Health Research, and has acted as a consultant to the UK Office of the Chief Scientist.

Footnotes
References
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Influence of Time to Change's social marketing interventions on stigma in England 2009-2011

  • Sara Evans-Lacko (a1), Estelle Malcolm (a1), Keon West (a2), Diana Rose (a3), Jillian London (a3), Nicolas Rüsch (a4), Kirsty Little (a3), Claire Henderson (a3) and Graham Thornicroft (a3)...
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