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Long-term effectiveness of a parenting intervention for children at risk of developing conduct disorder

  • Tracey Bywater (a1), Judy Hutchings (a1), David Daley (a2), Chris Whitaker (a2), Seow Tien Yeo (a2), Karen Jones (a1), Catrin Eames (a1) and Rhiannon Tudor Edwards (a3)...
Abstract
Background

The typical pattern for intervention outcome studies for conduct problems has been for effect sizes to dissipate over time with decreasing effects across subsequent follow-ups.

Aims

To establish whether the short-term positive effects of a parenting programme are sustained longer term. To observe trends, and costs, in health and social service use after intervention.

Method

Parents with children aged 36–59 months at risk of developing conduct disorder (n = 104) received intervention between baseline and first follow-up (6 months after baseline n = 86) in 11 Sure Start areas in North Wales. Follow-ups two (n = 82) and three (n = 79) occurred 12 and 18 months after baseline. Child problem behaviour and parenting skills were assessed via parent self-report and direct observation in the home.

Results

The significant parent-reported improvements in primary measures of child behaviour, parent behaviour, parental stress and depression gained at follow-up one were maintained to follow-up three, as were improved observed child and parent behaviours. Overall, 63% of children made a minimum significant change (0.3 standard deviations) on the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory problem scale between baseline and follow-up (using intention-to-treat data), 54% made a large change (0.8 standard deviations) and 39% made a very large change (1.5 standard deviations). Child contact with health and social services had reduced at follow-up three.

Conclusions

Early parent-based intervention reduced child antisocial behaviour and benefits were maintained, with reduced reliance on health and social service provision, over time.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
Tracey Bywater, School of Psychology, Bangor University, College Road, Bangor, Gwynedd, LL57 2DG, UK. Email: t.bywater@bangor.ac.uk
Footnotes
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Research grant from the Health Foundation, grant number 1583/1566. The funders had no involvement in the writing of this paper.

Declaration of interest

J.H. is paid by the Incredible Years programme developer for running occasional training courses in the delivery of the parent programme.

Footnotes
References
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Long-term effectiveness of a parenting intervention for children at risk of developing conduct disorder

  • Tracey Bywater (a1), Judy Hutchings (a1), David Daley (a2), Chris Whitaker (a2), Seow Tien Yeo (a2), Karen Jones (a1), Catrin Eames (a1) and Rhiannon Tudor Edwards (a3)...
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