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Models as a high-risk group: The health implications of a size zero culture

  • Janet L. Treasure (a1), Elizabeth R. Wack (a1) and Marion E. Roberts (a1)
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Abstract
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Corresponding author
Janet Treasure, Department of Academic Psychiatry, 5th Floor Bermondsey Wing, Guy's Hospital, London SE1 9RT, UK. Email: j.treasure@iop.kcl.ac.uk
References
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2 Johnson, JG, Cohen, P, Kasen, S, Brook, JS. Eating disorders during adolescence and the risk for physical and mental disorders during early adulthood. Arch Gen Psychiatry 2002; 59: 545–52.
3 Keys, A, Brozek, J, Henschel, A. The Biology of Human Starvation. University of Minnesota Press, 1950.
4 Corwin, RL. Bingeing rats: a model of intermittent excessive behavior? Appetite 2006; 46: 1115.
5 Pope, HG Jr, Lalonde, JK, Pindyck, LJ, Walsh, T, Bulik, CM, Crow, SJ, McElroy, SL, Rosenthal, N, Hudson, JI. Binge eating disorder: a stable syndrome. Am J Psychiatry 2006; 163: 2181–3.
6 Measelle, JR, Stice, E, Hogansen, JM. Developmental trajectories of co-occurring depressive, eating, antisocial, and substance abuse problems in female adolescents. J Abnorm Psychol 2006; 115: 524–38.
7 Bulik, CM, Klump, KL, Thornton, L, Kaplan, AS, Devlin, B, Fichter, MM, Halmi, KA, Strober, M, Woodside, DB, Crow, S, Mitchell, JE, Rotondo, A, Mauri, M, Cassano, GB, Keel, PK, Berrettini, WH, Kaye, WH. Alcohol use disorder comorbidity in eating disorders: a multicenter study. J Clin Psychiatry 2004; 65: 1000–6.
8 Santonastaso, P, Mondini, S, Favaro, A. Are fashion models a group at risk for eating disorders and substance abuse? Psychother Psychosom 2002; 71: 168–72.
9 Groesz, LM, Levine, MP, Murnen, SK. The effect of experimental presentation of thin media images on body satisfaction: a meta-analytic review. Int J Eat Disord 2002; 31: 116.
10 UK Sport. Eating Disorders in Sport: A Guideline Framework for Practitioners Working with High Performance Athletes. UK Sport, 2007 (http://www.uksport.gov.uk/pages/uk_sport_publications/).
11 Model Health Inquiry. Fashioning a Healthy Future: the Report of the Model Health Inquiry, September 2007. Model Health Inquiry, 2007 (http://www.modelhealthinquiry.com/docs/The%20Report%20of%20the%20Model%20Health%20Inquiry,%20September%202007.pdf).
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The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
  • URL: /core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry
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Models as a high-risk group: The health implications of a size zero culture

  • Janet L. Treasure (a1), Elizabeth R. Wack (a1) and Marion E. Roberts (a1)
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