Skip to main content Accesibility Help
×
×
Home

Mood instability: Significance, definition and measurement

  • M. R. Broome (a1), K. E. A. Saunders (a2), P. J. Harrison (a2) and S. Marwaha (a3)
Summary

Mood instability is common, and an important feature of several psychiatric disorders. We discuss the definition and measurement of mood instability, and review its prevalence, characteristics, neurobiological correlates and clinical implications. We suggest that mood instability has underappreciated transdiagnostic potential as an investigational and therapeutic target.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Mood instability: Significance, definition and measurement
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Mood instability: Significance, definition and measurement
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Mood instability: Significance, definition and measurement
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) licence.
Corresponding author
Matthew Broome, Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, Warneford Hospital, Warneford Lane, Oxford, OX3 7JX, UK. Email: matthew.broome@psych.ox.ac.uk
Footnotes
Hide All

Declaration of interest

P.J.H. has sat on advisory boards for Sunovion and Roche, and has been an expert witness in pharmaceutical patent litigation cases. S.M. has received sponsorship from Otsuka and Lundbeck to attend an academic congress and owns shares in GSK and AstraZeneca.

Footnotes
References
Hide All
1 Marwaha, S, Parsons, N, Flanagan, S, Broome, M. The prevalence and clinical associations of mood instability in adults living in England: results from the Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey 2007. Psychiatry Res 2013; 205: 262–8.
2 Marwaha, S, Parsons, N, Broome, M. Mood instability, mental illness and suicidal ideas: results from a household survey. Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol 2013; 48: 1431–7.
3 Howes, O, Lim, S, Theologos, G, Yung, AR, Goodwin, GM, McGuire, P. A comprehensive review and model of putative prodromal features of bipolar affective disorder. Psychol Med 2011; 41: 1567–77.
4 Marwaha, S, Broome, MR, Bebbington, P, Kuipers, E, Freeman, D. Mood instability and psychosis: analyses of British national survey data. Schizophr Bull 2014; 40: 269–77.
5 Strejilevich, SA, Martino, DJ, Murru, A, Teitelbaum, J, Fassi, G, Marengo, E, et al. Mood instability and functional recovery in bipolar disorders. Acta Psychiatr Scand 2013; 128: 194202.
6 American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th edn) (DSM-IV). APA, 1994.
7 Marwaha, S, He, Z, Broome, MR, Singh, SP, Scott, J, Eyden, J, et al. How is affective instability defined and measured? A systematic review. Psychol Med 2014; 44: 1793–808.
8 Bilderbeck, AC, Saunders, KEA, Price, J, Goodwin, GM. Psychiatric assessment of mood instability: qualitative study of patient experience. Br J Psychiatry 2014; 204: 234–9.
9 Solhan, MB, Trull, TJ, Jahng, S, Wood, PK. Clinical assessment of affective instability: comparing EMA indices, questionnaire reports, and retrospective recall. Psychol Assess 2009; 21: 425–36.
10 Bonsall, MB, Wallace-Hadrill, SMA, Geddes, JR, Goodwin, GM, Holmes, EA. Nonlinear time-series approaches in characterizing mood stability and mood instability in bipolar disorder. Proc Biol Sci 2012; 279: 916–24.
11 Glenn, T, Monteith, S. New measures of mental state and behavior based on data collected from sensors, smartphones, and the internet. Curr Psychiatry Rep 2014; 16: 523.
12 Insel, T, Cuthbert, B, Garvey, M, Heinssen, R, Pine, DS, Quinn, K, et al. Research Domain Criteria (RDoC): toward a new classification framework for research on mental disorders. Am J Psychiatry 2010; 167: 748–51.
13 Broome, MR, He, Z, Iftikhar, M, Eyden, J, Marwaha, S. Neurobiological and behavioural studies of affective instability in clinical populations: a systematic review. Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2015; 51: 243–54.
14 Bourne, C, Aydemir, Ö, Balanzá-Martínez, V, Bora, E, Brissos, S, Cavanagh, JTO, et al. Neuropsychological testing of cognitive impairment in euthymic bipolar disorder: an individual patient data meta-analysis. Acta Psychiatr Scand 2013; 128: 149–62.
15 Harmer, CJ, Goodwin, GM, Cowen, PJ. Why do antidepressants take so long to work? A cognitive neuropsychological model of antidepressant drug action. Br J Psychiatry 2009; 195: 102–8.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
  • URL: /core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed

Mood instability: Significance, definition and measurement

  • M. R. Broome (a1), K. E. A. Saunders (a2), P. J. Harrison (a2) and S. Marwaha (a3)
Submit a response

eLetters

Mood instability associated with poor clinical outcomes in people with a wide range of mental disorders

Rashmi K. Patel, MRC Clinical Research Training Fellow, Department of Psychosis Studies, King's College London
01 October 2015

In their editorial[1] Broome et al. review the implications of mood instability in people with psychiatric disorders. In the largest known study on mood instability to date (investigating electronic health record data from over 27,000 people),[2] we found that mood instability was associated with a wide range of mental disorders including bipolar disorder, personality disorder, schizophrenia and depression. After adjusting for demographic factors and diagnosis, mood instability was independently associated with increased frequency and duration of hospital admission as well as increased likelihood of treatment with an antipsychotic or non-antipsychotic mood stabiliser. Our findings, drawn from naturalistic data from a real-world clinical setting, highlight the importance of mood instability in people with a wide range of mental disorders and the need for further research to investigate which treatments are most effective.

1 Broome MR, Saunders KEA, Harrison PJ, Marwaha S. Mood instability: significance, definition and measurement. Br J Psychiatry 2015; 207: 283–5.

2 Patel R, Lloyd T, Jackson R, Ball M, Shetty H, Broadbent M, et al. Mood instability is a common feature of mental health disorders and is associated with poor clinical outcomes. BMJ Open 2015; 5 . doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2014-007504.
... More

Conflict of interest: None Declared

Write a reply

×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *