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Moving on from old dichotomies: beyond nature-nurture towards a lifeline perspective

  • Steven Rose (a1)
Abstract
Background

Genetics is increasingly being used to explain human behaviours, with growing enthusiasm for what could be termed ‘genetic determinism’, which an ultra-Darwinist approach seeks to apply to all aspects of the human condition.

Aims

To consider the validity of the claims concerning the genetics of human behaviour and psychological distress.

Method

A critical review of the current assumptions about the relative contributions of genetics and the environment.

Results and conclusions

Organisms are in constant interaction with their environment: that is, organisms select environments just as environments select organisms. Like organisms, environments evolve and are homeodynamic rather than homeostatic; both ‘genome’ and ‘envirome’ are abstractions from this continuous dialectic.

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Copyright
References
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The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
  • URL: /core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry
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Moving on from old dichotomies: beyond nature-nurture towards a lifeline perspective

  • Steven Rose (a1)
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