Skip to main content
×
×
Home

National dissemination of effective parenting programmes to improve child outcomes

  • Stephen Scott (a1)
Summary

Although living standards have increased in the past 40 years, children's behaviour problems have become worse. Good parenting can help by maximising children's potential and promoting resilience. Effective programmes are available that improve parenting, but unfortunately ineffective approaches are still used widely. A new National Academy for Parenting Practitioners has been set up in England, which offers free training in evidence-based interventions and conducts research to increase their effectiveness.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      National dissemination of effective parenting programmes to improve child outcomes
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      National dissemination of effective parenting programmes to improve child outcomes
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      National dissemination of effective parenting programmes to improve child outcomes
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
References
Hide All
1 Layard, R, Dunn, J. A Good Childhood. Penguin, 2009.
2 Collishaw, S, Maughan, B, Goodman, R, Pickles, A. Time trends in adolescent mental health. J Child Psychol Psychiatry 2004; 45: 1350–62.
3 Green, H, McGinnity, A, Meltzer, H, Ford, T, Goodman, R. Mental Health of Children and Young People in Great Britain, 2004. TSO (The Stationery Office), 2005.
4 United Nations Children's Fund. Child Poverty in Perspective: An Overview of Child Well-Being in Rich Countries. UNICEF, 2007.
5 O'Connor, TG, Scott, SBC. Parenting and Outcomes for Children. Joseph Rowntree Foundation, 2006.
6 Berger, L, Paxson, C, Waldfogel, J. Income and child development. Child Youth Serv Rev 2009; 31: 978–89.
7 Belsky, J, Bakermans-Kranenburg, MJ, van Ijzendoorn, MH. For better and for worse: differential susceptibility to environmental influences. Curr Dir Psychol Sci 2007; 16: 300–4.
8 Fergusson, D, Horwood, J, Ridder, E. Show me the child at seven: the consequences of conduct problems in childhood for psychosocial functioning in adulthood. J Child Psychol Psychiatry 2005; 46: 837–49.
9 Scott, S, Knapp, M, Henderson, J, Maughan, B. Financial cost of social exclusion. Follow up study of antisocial children into adulthood. BMJ 2001; 323: 191–4.
10 Scott, S, Spender, Q, Doolan, M, Jacobs, B, Aspland, H. Multicentre controlled trial of parenting groups for childhood antisocial behaviour in clinical practice. BMJ 2001; 323: 194–7.
11 Scott, S, Sylva, K, Doolan, M, Price, J, Jacobs, J, Crook, C, et al. Randomised controlled trial of parent groups for child antisocial behaviour targeting multiple risk factors: the SPOKES project. J Child Psychol Psychiatry 2009; in press.
12 Dodge, K. Community intervention and public policy in the prevention of antisocial behaviour. J Child Psychol Psychiatry 2009; 50: 194200.
13 Scott, S. Parenting programs. In Rutter's Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (5th edn) (eds Rutter, M, Bishop, D, Pine, D, Scott, S, Stevenson, J, Taylor, E, et al). Blackwell, 2008.
14 McAuley, C, Knapp, M, Beecham, J, McCurry, N, Sleed, M. The Outcomes and Costs of Home-Start Support for Young Families Under Stress. Joseph Rowntree Foundation, 2004.
15 Washington State Institute for Public Policy. Outcome Evaluation of Washington State's Research-Based Programs for Juvenile Offenders. Washington State Institute for Public Policy, 2004.
16 Melhuish, E, Belsky, J, Leyland, A, Barnes, J, NESS Team. Effects of fully-established Sure Start Local Programmes on 3-year-old children in England. Lancet 2008; 372: 1641–7.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
  • URL: /core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed

National dissemination of effective parenting programmes to improve child outcomes

  • Stephen Scott (a1)
Submit a response

eLetters

No eLetters have been published for this article.

×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *