Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
×
Home

The neuroscience of attachment: implications for psychological therapies

  • Jeremy Holmes (a1) and Arietta Slade (a2)
Summary

Recent advances in attachment-informed relational neuroscience point to possible mechanisms of action of psychological therapies, with implications for effective practice.

Declaration of interest

None.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      The neuroscience of attachment: implications for psychological therapies
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      The neuroscience of attachment: implications for psychological therapies
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      The neuroscience of attachment: implications for psychological therapies
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
Correspondence: Professor Jeremy Holmes, Psychology, University of Exeter, Washington Singer Building, Perry Road, Exeter EX4 4QG, UK. Email: j.a.holmes@btinternet.com
Footnotes
Hide All
*

J.H. wrote the first draft, subsequently added to by A.S.

Footnotes
References
Hide All
1Cassidy, J, Shaver, P (eds). Handbook of Attachment (3rd edn): 242–69. Guilford Press, 2016.
2Holmes, J, Slade, A. Attachment in Therapeutic Practice. SAGE, 2017.
3Schore, A. The right brain is dominant in psychotherapy. Psychotherapy 2014; 51: 388–97.
4Feldman, R. Sensitive periods in human social development: New insights from research on oxytocin, synchrony, and high-risk parenting. Dev Psychopathol 2015; 27: 369–95.
5Strathearn, L, Fonagy, P, Amico, J, Montague, PR. Adult attachment predicts maternal brain and oxytocin response to infant cues. Neuropsychopharmacology 2009; 34: 2655–66.
6Rincon-Cortes, M, Sullivan, R. Early life trauma and attachment: immediate and enduring effects on neurobiological and stress axis development. Front Endocrinol 2014; 5: 33.
7Wilson, DS, Hayes, S, Biglan, A, Embry, D. Evolving the future: towards a science of intentional change. Behav Brain Sci 2014; 37: 395460.
8Beebe, B, Lachmann, F. The Origins of Attachment: Infant Research and Adult Treatment. Routledge, 2013.
9Slade, A. Imagining fear: attachment, threat, and the dynamics of psychic experience. Psychoanal Dialogues 2014; 24: 254–66.
10Lorenz, K. King Solomon's Ring (trans. M. Wilson). Methuen, 1961.
11Tottenham, N. The importance of early experiences for neuro-affective development. In The Neurobiology of Childhood, Vol. 16 (eds Anderson, S, Pine, D): 109–29. Springer, 2014.
12Lyons-Ruth, K, Jacobvitz, D. Attachment disorganization: Genetic factors, parenting contexts, and developmental transformation from infancy to adulthood. In Handbook of Attachment: Theory, Research, and Clinical Applications (3rd edn) (eds Cassidy, J, Shaver, P): 667–96. Guilford Press, 2016.
13Hemsley, D, Garety, P. The formation of maintenance of delusions. Br J Psychiatry 1986; 149: 51–6.
14Debbane, M, Salaminios, G, Luyten, P, Badoud, D, Armando, M, Solida Tozzi, A, et al. Attachment, neurobiology and mentalizing along the psychosis continuum. Front. Hum. Neurosci 2016; 10: 406.
15Friston, K. The free energy principle: a unified brain theory? Nat Rev Neurosci 2010; 11: 127–38.
16Linehan, M. Cognitive Behavioral Treatment of Borderline Personality Disorder. Guilford Press, 1993.
17Coan, J. Attachment and neuroscience. In Handbook of Attachment (3rd edn) (eds Cassidy, J, Shaver, P): 242–69. Guilford Press, 2016.
18Fonagy, P, Luyten, P, Strathearn, L. Borderline personality disorder, mentalisation and the neurobiology of attachment. Infant Ment Health J 2011; 32: 4769.
19Bateman, AW, Fonagy, P. Handbook of mentalizing in mental health practice. American Psychiatric Publishing, 2012.
20Barrett, LF. The theory of constructed emotion: an active inference account of interoception and categorisation. Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci 2017: 123.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
  • URL: /core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed

The neuroscience of attachment: implications for psychological therapies

  • Jeremy Holmes (a1) and Arietta Slade (a2)
Submit a response

eLetters

No eLetters have been published for this article.

×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *