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Non-psychotic psychiatric disorder and subsequent risk of schizophrenia: Cohort study

  • Glyn Lewis (a1), Anthony S. David (a2), Aslög Malmberg (a3) and Peter Allebeck (a4)
Extract
Background

Those with schizophrenia often give a history of premorbid non-psychotic psychiatric disorder.

Aims

To investigate the association between non-psychotic psychiatric disorders and the later development of schizophrenia.

Method

Men aged 18 or 19 years, conscripted to the Swedish army in 1970 (n=50 054) were linked to the Swedish National Psychiatric Case Register.

Results

There was an increased risk of schizophrenia in those with ICD–8 diagnoses of neurosis (OR=4.6,95% CI 3.2–6.9), personality disorder (OR=8.2, 95% CI 5.4–12.3), alcohol abuse (OR=5.5, 95% CI 1.7–17.5) or substance abuse (OR=14.0, 95% CI 7.8–25.0) at age 18. Of those who developed schizophrenia, 38% (95% CI 32–45) received a diagnosis of non-psychotic psychiatric disorder at age 18. Only those with personality disorder had a significantly increased risk of schizophrenia (OR=2.4, 95% CI 1.1–5.2) with onset after age 23.

Conclusions

Personality factors could represent an underlying vulnerability to schizophrenia. Other diagnoses occurring before schizophrenia may reflect a prodromal phase of the illness.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
Glyn Lewis, Division of Psychological Medicine, University of Wales College of Medicine, Monmouth House, Heath Park, Cardiff CF4 4XN, UK. E-mail: wpcghl@cardiff.ac.uk
Footnotes
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Declaration of interest

Supported by the Swedish Medical Research Council and the Söderberg-Königska Foundation. No conflict of interest.

Footnotes
References
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The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
  • URL: /core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry
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Non-psychotic psychiatric disorder and subsequent risk of schizophrenia: Cohort study

  • Glyn Lewis (a1), Anthony S. David (a2), Aslög Malmberg (a3) and Peter Allebeck (a4)
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