Skip to main content
×
×
Home

Occult suicidality in an emergency department population

  • Cynthia A. Claassen (a1) and Gregory L. Larkin (a2)
Summary

The prevalence and severity of suicidal ideation was established in a patient sample seeking emergency treatment for non-psychiatric reasons. Using a computerised mental health screening panel, data were collected from waiting-room patients during randomised shifts over a 45-day period. Of 1590 screened patients, 185 (11.6%) acknowledged suicidal ideation and 31 (2%) reported planning to kill themselves. Almost all of those with suicidal ideation (97%) acknowledged symptoms consistent with mood, anxiety and/or substance-related disorders. Structured medical record review revealed that 25 of the 31 patients planning suicide were undetected during their index visit, and that 4 attempted suicide within 45 days of the visit. All survived.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Occult suicidality in an emergency department population
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Occult suicidality in an emergency department population
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Occult suicidality in an emergency department population
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
Dr Cynthia A. Claassen, Department of Psychiatry, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, TX 75390-9119, USA. E-mail: Cindy.Claassen@UTSouthwestern.edu
Footnotes
Hide All

Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
Hide All
Appleby, L., Shaw, J., Amos, T., et al (1999) Suicide within 12 months of contact with mental health services: national clinical survey. BMJ, 318, 12351239.
Crosby, A. E., Cheltenham, M. P. & Sacks, J. J. (1999) Incidence of suicidal ideation and behavior in the United States, 1994. Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior, 29, 131140.
Gairin, I., House, A. & Owens, D. (2003) Attendance at the accident and emergency department in the year before suicide: retrospective study. British Journal of Psychiatry, 183, 2833.
Johnson, J., Weissman, M. M. & Klerman, G. L. (1990) Panic disorder, comorbidity, and suicide attempts. Archives of General Psychiatry, 47, 805808.
Michel, K., Runeson, B., Valach, L., et al (1997) Contacts of suicide attempters with GPs prior to the event: a comparison between Stockholm and Bern. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 95, 9499.
Pirkis, J. & Burgess, P. (1998) Suicide and recency of health care contacts. A systematic review. British Journal of Psychiatry, 173, 462474.
Rollman, B. L. & Shear, M. K. (2003) Depression and medical comorbidity: red flags for current suicidal ideation in primary care. Psychosomatic Medicine, 65, 506507.
Shedler, J. (2000) The Shedler QPD Panel (Quick Psycho Diagnostics panel): a psychiatric ‘lab test’ for primary care. In Handbook of Psychological Assessment in Primary Care Settings (ed. Maruish, M.), pp. 277296. New York: Erlbaum.
Shedler, J., Beck, A. & Bensen, S. (2000) Practica mental health assessment in primary care. Validity and utility of the Quick Psycho Diagnostics Panel. Journal of Family Practice, 49, 614621.
Weissman, M. M. (1990) The hidden patient: unrecognized panic disorder. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 51 (suppl), 58.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
  • URL: /core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×
Type Description Title
UNKNOWN
Supplementary materials

Claassen and Larkin supplementary material
Supplementary Material

 Unknown (529 bytes)
529 bytes
PDF
Supplementary materials

Claassen and Larkin supplementary material
Supplementary Table S1

 PDF (32 KB)
32 KB

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed

Occult suicidality in an emergency department population

  • Cynthia A. Claassen (a1) and Gregory L. Larkin (a2)
Submit a response

eLetters

No eLetters have been published for this article.

×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *