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Persistent violent offending: what do we know?

  • Sheilagh Hodgins (a1)
Summary

A great deal is known about men who display a stable pattern of antisocial behaviour since childhood. However, more research is needed to identify subtypes within this population so as to further understanding of the causal processes that initiate and maintain violent behaviours and to identify interventions that specifically target the deficits presented by each subtype. Evidence-based practice means not only using treatments proven to be effective but also basing conceptualisations of disorders on scientific evidence.

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References
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The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
  • URL: /core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry
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Persistent violent offending: what do we know?

  • Sheilagh Hodgins (a1)
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