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Personality disorders and normal personality dimensions in obsessive-compulsive disorder

  • Jack Samuels (a1), Gerald Nestadt (a1), O. Joseph Bienvenu (a1), Paul T. Costa (a2), Mark A. Riddle (a3), Kung-Yee Liang (a4), Rudolf Hoehn-Saric (a5), Marco A. Grados (a5) and Bernadette A. M. Cullen (a5)...

Extract

Background

Little is known about personality disorders and normal personality dimensions in relatives of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).

Aims

To determine whether specific personality characteristics are part of a familial spectrum of OCD.

Method

Clinicians evaluated personality disorders in 72 OCD case and 72 control probands and 198 case and 207 control first-degree relatives. The self-completed Revised NEO Personality Inventory was used for assessment of normal personality dimensions. The prevalence of personality disorders and scores on normal personality dimensions were compared between case and control probands and between case and control relatives.

Results

Case probands and case relatives had a high prevalence of obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (OCPD) and high neuroticism scores. Neuroticism was associated with OCPD in case but not control relatives.

Conclusions

Neuroticism and OCPD may share a common familial aetiology with OCD.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Dr Jack Samuels, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Meyer 4–181, 600 N. Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA

Footnotes

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Declaration of interest

Supported by National Institutes of Health grants R01 MH50214 and NIH/NCRR/OPD-GCRC RR00052.

Footnotes

References

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Personality disorders and normal personality dimensions in obsessive-compulsive disorder

  • Jack Samuels (a1), Gerald Nestadt (a1), O. Joseph Bienvenu (a1), Paul T. Costa (a2), Mark A. Riddle (a3), Kung-Yee Liang (a4), Rudolf Hoehn-Saric (a5), Marco A. Grados (a5) and Bernadette A. M. Cullen (a5)...

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Personality disorders and normal personality dimensions in obsessive-compulsive disorder

  • Jack Samuels (a1), Gerald Nestadt (a1), O. Joseph Bienvenu (a1), Paul T. Costa (a2), Mark A. Riddle (a3), Kung-Yee Liang (a4), Rudolf Hoehn-Saric (a5), Marco A. Grados (a5) and Bernadette A. M. Cullen (a5)...
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