Skip to main content Accesibility Help
×
×
Home

Prevalence of mental health problems in schools: poverty and other risk factors among 28 000 adolescents in England

  • Jessica Deighton (a1), Suzet Tanya Lereya (a2), Polly Casey (a2), Praveetha Patalay (a3), Neil Humphrey (a4) and Miranda Wolpert (a1)...
Summary

Current mental health provision for children is based on estimates of one in ten children experiencing mental health problems. This study analyses a large-scale community-based dataset of 28 160 adolescents to explore school-based prevalence of mental health problems and characteristics that predict increased odds of experiencing them. Findings indicate the scale of mental health problems in England is much higher than previous estimates, with two in five young people scoring above thresholds for emotional problems, conduct problems or hyperactivity. Gender, deprivation, child in need status, ethnicity and age were all associated with increased odds of experiencing mental health difficulties.

Declarations of interest

None.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Prevalence of mental health problems in schools: poverty and other risk factors among 28 000 adolescents in England
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Prevalence of mental health problems in schools: poverty and other risk factors among 28 000 adolescents in England
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Prevalence of mental health problems in schools: poverty and other risk factors among 28 000 adolescents in England
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
Corresponding author
Correspondence: Jessica Deighton, Evidence Based Practice Unit, UCL and the Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families, 12 Maresfield Gardens, London NW3 5SU, UK. Email: ebpu@annafreud.org
References
Hide All
1Green, H, McGinnity, A, Meltzer, H, Ford, T, Goodman, R. Mental Health of Children and Young People in Great Britain, 2004. Report No.: 1403986371. Office for National Statistics, 2005.
2Kessler, RC, Berglund, P, Demler, O, Jin, R, Merikangas, KR, Walters, EE. Lifetime prevalence and age-of-onset distributions of DSM-IV disorders in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication. Arch Gen Psychiatry 2005; 62: 593602.
3Fazel, M, Hoagwood, K, Stephan, S, Ford, T. Mental health interventions in schools in high-income countries. Lancet Psychiatry 2014; 1: 377–87.
4Department of Health and Social Care and the Department of Education. Transforming Children and Young People's Mental Health Provision: A Green Paper. Department of Health and Social Care and the Department of Education, 2017.
5Department of Health and Social Care, Education Df. Government Response to the Consultation on Transforming Children and Young People's Mental Health Provision: A Green Paper and Next Steps. Department of Health and Social Care and the Department of Education , 2018.
6NHS Digital. Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017: Summary of Key Findings. Government Statistical Service, 2018.
7Fink, E, Patalay, P, Sharpe, H, Holley, S, Deighton, J, Wolpert, M. Mental health difficulties in early adolescence: a comparison of two cross-sectional studies in England from 2009 to 2014. J Adolesc Health 2015; 56: 502–7.
8Patalay, P, Fitzsimons, E. Mental Ill-Health Among Children of the New Century: Trends Across Childhood with a Focus on Age 14. Centre for Longitudinal Studies, 2017.
9Merikangas, KR, Avenevoli, S, Costello, EJ, Koretz, D, Kessler, RC. National comorbidity survey replication adolescent supplement (NCS-A): I. Background and measures. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2009; 48: 367–79.
10Goodman, R, Meltzer, H, Bailey, V. The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire: a pilot study on the validity of the self-report version. Int Rev Psychiatry 1998; 15: 173–7.
11Pitchforth, J, Fahy, K, Ford, T, Wolpert, M, Viner, RM, Hargreaves, DS. Mental health and well-being trends among children and young people in the UK, 1995–2014: analysis of repeated cross-sectional national health surveys. Psychol Med 2018; Sept 11 (Epub ahead of print).
12World Health Organization and the and the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation. Social Determinants of Mental Health. World Health Organization, 2014.
13Hutchings, M, Kazmi, N. Exam Factories? The Impact of Accountability Measures on Children and Young People. NUT, 2015.
14Smaldone, A, Honig, JC, Byrne, MW. Sleepless in America: inadequate sleep and relationships to health and well-being of our nation's children. Pediatrics 2007; 119 (suppl 1): S2937.
15Kushlev, K, Proulx, J, Dunn, EW. Silence your Phones: Smartphone Notifications Increase Inattention and Hyperactivity Symptoms. ACM, 2016 (https://interruptions.net/literature/Kushlev-CHI16.pdf).
16Polanczyk, GV, Salum, GA, Sugaya, LS, Caye, A, Rohde, LA. Annual research review: a meta-analysis of the worldwide prevalence of mental disorders in children and adolescents. J Child Psychol Psychiatry 2015; 56: 345–65.
17Cheng, S, Keyes, KM, Bitfoi, A, Carta, MG, Koç, C, Goelitz, D, et al. Understanding parent–teacher agreement of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ): comparison across seven European countries. Int J Methods Psychiatr Res 2018; 27: e1589.
18Goodman, R, Ford, T, Simmons, H, Gatward, R, Meltzer, H. Using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) to screen for child psychiatric disorders in a community sample. Int Rev Psychiatry 2003; 15: 166–72.
19Patalay, P, Moulton, V, Goodman, A, Ploubidis, GB. Cross-domain symptom development typologies and their antecedents: results from the UK millennium cohort study. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2017; 56: 76576.e2.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
  • URL: /core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed

Prevalence of mental health problems in schools: poverty and other risk factors among 28 000 adolescents in England

  • Jessica Deighton (a1), Suzet Tanya Lereya (a2), Polly Casey (a2), Praveetha Patalay (a3), Neil Humphrey (a4) and Miranda Wolpert (a1)...
Submit a response

eLetters

No eLetters have been published for this article.

×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *