Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Psychiatric diagnosis: impersonal, imperfect and important

  • Nick Craddock (a1) and Laurence Mynors-Wallis (a2)

Summary

Psychiatric diagnosis is in the spotlight following the recent publication of DSM-5. In this article we consider both the benefits and limitations of diagnosis in psychiatry. The use of internationally recognised diagnoses, although insufficient alone, is part of a psychiatrist's professional responsibility to provide high-quality, evidence-based care for patients.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Psychiatric diagnosis: impersonal, imperfect and important
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Psychiatric diagnosis: impersonal, imperfect and important
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Psychiatric diagnosis: impersonal, imperfect and important
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

Nick Craddock, Department of Psychological Medicine and Neurology, Henry Wellcome Building, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Heath Park, Cardiff CF14 4XN, UK. Email: craddockn@cardiff.ac.uk

Footnotes

Hide All

Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes

References

Hide All
1 American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th edn) (DSM-5). APA, 2013.
2 Gornall, J. DSM-5: a fatal diagnosis? BMJ 2013; 346: f3256.
3 Davies, J. Cracked. Why Psychiatry is Doing More Harm Than Good. Icon Books, 2013.
4 Spence, D. Bad medicine: bipolar II disorder. BMJ 2011; 342: d2767.
5 Wykes, T, Callard, F. Diagnosis, diagnosis, diagnosis: towards DSM-5. J Ment Health 2010; 19: 301–4.
6 Timimi, S. “No more psychiatric labels” petition. BMJ 2012; 344: e3534.
7 Kendell, RE. The Role of Diagnosis in Psychiatry: 176. Blackwell Scientific Publications.
8 Kupfer, DJ, First, MB, Regier, DA. A Research Agenda for DSM-V. American Psychiatric Association, 2002.
9 Craddock, N, Owen, MJ. Rethinking psychosis: the disadvantages of a dichotomous classification now outweigh the advantages. World Psychiatry 2007; 6: 8491.
10 Maj, M. Psychiatric diagnosis: pros and cons of prototypes vs. operational criteria. World Psychiatry 2011; 10: 81–2.
11 Insel, T, Cuthbert, B, Garvey, M, Heinssen, R, Pine, DS, Quinn, K, et al. Research domain criteria (RDoC): toward a new classification framework for research on mental disorders. Am J Psychiatry 2010; 167: 748–51.
12 Aldhous, P, Coghlan, A. A revolution in mental health. New Sci 2013; 2916: 89.
13 Craddock, N, Owen, MJ. The Kraepelinian dichotomy – going, going … but still not gone. Br J Psychiatry 2010; 196: 92–5.
14 Craddock, N, Kerr, M, Thapar, A. The right call. Open Mind 2010; 163: 67.
15 Rethink Mental Illness. The Abandoned Illness: A Report by the Schizophrenia Commission. Rethink Mental Illness, 2012.
16 Farmer, AE, Williams, J, Jones, I. Phenotypic definitions of psychotic illness for molecular genetic research. Am J Med Genet (Neuropsychiatr Genet) 1994; 54: 365–71.
17 Leucht, S, Hierl, S, Kissling, W, Dold, M, Davis, JM. Putting the efficacy of psychiatric and general medicine medication into perspective: review of meta-analyses. Br J Psychiatry 2012; 200: 97106.
18 Casey, BJ, Craddock, N, Cuthbert, BN, Hyman, SE, Lee, FS, Ressler, KJ. DSM-5 and RDoC: progress in psychiatry research? Nat Rev Neurosci 2013; 14: 810–4.
19 Insel, T. NIMH Director's Blog: Transforming Diagnosis, 29 April 2013. NIMH, 2013 (http://www.nimh.nih.gov/about/director/2013/transforming-diagnosis.shtml).
20 White, PD, Rickards, H, Zeman, AZ. Time to end the distinction between mental and neurological illnesses. BMJ 2012; 344: e3454.
21 Royal College of Psychiatrists. Good Psychiatric Practice (3rd edn). (College Report CR154). Royal College of Psychiatrists, 2009.

Psychiatric diagnosis: impersonal, imperfect and important

  • Nick Craddock (a1) and Laurence Mynors-Wallis (a2)

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed

Psychiatric diagnosis: impersonal, imperfect and important

  • Nick Craddock (a1) and Laurence Mynors-Wallis (a2)
Submit a response

eLetters

We encountered an error trying to retrieve eLetters for this article. Please try again or contact Customer Services

×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *