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Psychopathy in childhood: Why should we care about grandiose–manipulative and daring–impulsive traits?

  • Randall T. Salekin (a1)
Summary

Callous–unemotional traits have been incorporated into the DSM-5 and may be considered for the ICD-11. Despite the centrality of callous–unemotional traits, it is only one of three dimensions of child psychopathy. It is proposed that the grandiose–manipulative and daring–impulsive traits should be considered and potentially accepted as specifiers for conduct disorder in the DSM-5 and ICD-11.

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References
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The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
  • URL: /core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry
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Psychopathy in childhood: Why should we care about grandiose–manipulative and daring–impulsive traits?

  • Randall T. Salekin (a1)
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