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Recovery, peer support and confrontation in services for people with mental illness and/or substance use disorder

  • Patrick W. Corrigan (a1), Jonathon E. Larson (a2), David Smelson (a3) and Michelle Andra (a4)
Summary

Mental illness recovery has been described as an outcome (symptom free) or process (symptom management) where peer supporters are essential. Whereas, substance use disorder recovery endorses outcome alone: achieving recovery once abstinent. Peer supporters with an abstinence agenda use confrontation for those in denial. Herein, we unpack this distinction.

Declaration of interests

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Copyright
Corresponding author
Correspondence: Patrick W. Corrigan, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3424 South State Street, Chicago, IL 60616, USA. Email: corrigan@iit.edu
References
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1South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and South West London and St George's Mental Health NHS Trust. Recovery is for All. Hope, Agency and Opportunity in Psychiatry. A Position Statement by Consultant Psychiatrists. SLAM/SWLSTG, 2010 (https://www.rcpsych.ac.uk/pdf/Recovery%20is%20for%20all.pdf).
2Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. SAMHSA’s Working Definition of Recovery: 10 Guiding Principles. SAMHSA, 2012. (https://store.samhsa.gov/shin/content/PEP12-RECDEF/PEP12-RECDEF.pdf).
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8Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Core Competencies for Peer Workers in Behavioral Health Services. SAMHSA, 2015 (https://www.samhsa.gov/sites/default/files/programs_campaigns/brss_tacs/core-competencies.pdf).
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10Drake, RE, Bond, GR, Becker, DR. Individual Placement and Support: An Evidence-Based Approach to Supported Employment. Oxford University Press, 2012.
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The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
  • URL: /core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry
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Recovery, peer support and confrontation in services for people with mental illness and/or substance use disorder

  • Patrick W. Corrigan (a1), Jonathon E. Larson (a2), David Smelson (a3) and Michelle Andra (a4)
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