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Remembering delirium

  • Simon Fleminger (a1)
Extract

Delirium is now the preferred term to describe acute confusional states and related organic mental disorders associated with acute impairment of consciousness (Gill & Mayou, 2000). No longer is delirium reserved for those states in which overactive behaviour, often with visual hallucinations, is dominant. To accommodate the broader usage, hypoactive states of delirium have been emphasised (Lipowski, 1990), particularly as these are the states most easily missed.

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References
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The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
  • URL: /core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry
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Remembering delirium

  • Simon Fleminger (a1)
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