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Should psychiatrists read fiction?

  • Allan Beveridge (a1)
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The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
  • URL: /core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry
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Should psychiatrists read fiction?

  • Allan Beveridge (a1)
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eLetters

Should psychiatrists read fiction?

Anthony G Cummins, General Practitioner
07 May 2003

Sir,The answer has to be yes and furthermore "The ordeal of Gilbert Pinfold" should be required reading for every aspiring psychiatrist as it highlights better than any psychiatric text the nature of a psychotic state.

Anthony G Cummins

Conflict of interest: None Declared

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