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Stalking of mental health professionals: an underrecognised problem

  • Ronan J. McIvor (a1) and Edward Petch (a2)

Summary

Doctors and mental healthcare professionals are at greater risk of being stalked than the general population, particularly by their patients. Despite causing significant psychological distress, stalking remains underrecognised and poorly managed. Healthcare organisations should ensure appropriate policies are in place to aid awareness and minimise risk, including the provision of formal educational programmes.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Dr Ronan J. McIvor, Maudsley Hospital and Institute of Psychiatry, 103 Denmark Hill, London SE5 8AZ, UK. E-mail: r.mcivor@iop.kcl.ac.uk

Footnotes

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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes

References

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Stalking of mental health professionals: an underrecognised problem

  • Ronan J. McIvor (a1) and Edward Petch (a2)

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Stalking of mental health professionals: an underrecognised problem

  • Ronan J. McIvor (a1) and Edward Petch (a2)
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