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Strategies to prevent death by suicide: Meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

  • Natalie B. V. Riblet (a1), Brian Shiner (a1), Yinong Young-Xu (a2) and Bradley V. Watts (a2)
Abstract
Background

Few randomised controlled trials (RCTs) have shown decreases in suicide.

Aims

To identify interventions for preventing suicide.

Method

We searched EMBASE and Medline from inception until 31 December 2015. We included RCTs comparing prevention strategies with control. We pooled odds ratios (ORs) for suicide using the Peto method.

Results

Among 8647 citations, 72 RCTs and 6 pooled analyses met inclusion criteria. Three RCTs (n = 2028) found that the World Health Organization (WHO) brief intervention and contact (BIC) was associated with significantly lower odds of suicide (OR = 0.20, 95% CI 0.09–0.42). Six RCTs (n = 1040) of cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT) for suicide prevention and six RCTs of lithium (n = 619) yielded non-significant findings (OR = 0.34, 95% CI 0.12–1.03 and OR = 0.23, 95% CI 0.05–1.02, respectively).

Conclusions

The WHO BIC is a promising suicide prevention strategy. No other intervention showed a statistically significant effect in reducing suicide.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
Natalie Riblet, MD, MPH, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 215 North Main Street, White River Junction, VT 05009, USA. Email: Natalie.Riblet@dartmouth.edu
Footnotes
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See editorial, pp. 381–383, this issue.

Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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Strategies to prevent death by suicide: Meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

  • Natalie B. V. Riblet (a1), Brian Shiner (a1), Yinong Young-Xu (a2) and Bradley V. Watts (a2)
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