Skip to main content
×
×
Home

Use of medication for challenging behaviour in people with intellectual disability

  • Gyles Glover (a1), Sarah Bernard (a2), David Branford (a3), Anthony Holland (a4) and Andre Strydom (a5)...
Summary

Medications, particularly antipsychotics, are commonly used to manage challenging behaviour in people with intellectual disability. When the behaviour does not arise from an underlying mental illness, this is commonly off-licence and evidence of efficacy is lacking. A national audit programme would be one way to address the concerns this raises.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Use of medication for challenging behaviour in people with intellectual disability
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Use of medication for challenging behaviour in people with intellectual disability
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Use of medication for challenging behaviour in people with intellectual disability
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
Gyles Glover, Public Health England Knowledge and Intelligence Team (East), Institute of Public Health, University Forvie Site, Robinson Way, Cambridge CB2 0SR, UK. Email: Gyles.Glover@phe.gov.uk
Footnotes
Hide All

Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
Hide All
1 Department of Health. Transforming Care: A National Response to Winterbourne View Hospital. Department of Health Review: Final Report. Department of Health, 2012.
2 Royal College of Psychiatrists, British Psychological Society, Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists. Challenging Behaviour: A Unified Approach. Clinical and Service Guidelines for Supporting People with Learning Disabilities who are at Risk of Receiving Abusive or Restrictive Practices (College Report CR144). Royal College of Psychiatrists, 2007.
3 Paton, C, Flynn, A, Shingleton-Smith, A, McIntyre, S, Bhaumik, S, Rasmussen, J, et al. Nature and quality of antipsychotic prescribing practice in UK psychiatry of intellectual disability services. J Intellect Disabil Res 2011; 55: 665–74.
4 Emerson, E, Einfeld, SL (eds) Pharmacotherapy. In Challenging Behaviour (3rd edn): 94101. Cambridge University Press, 2011.
5 Tyrer, P, Oliver-Africano, PC, Ahmed, Z, Bouras, N, Cooray, S, Deb, S, et al. Risperidone, haloperidol, and placebo in the treatment of aggressive challenging behaviour in patients with intellectual disability: a randomised controlled trial. Lancet 2008; 371: 5763.
6 De Kuijper, G, Evenhuis, H, Minderaa, RB, Hoekstra, PY. Effects of controlled discontinuation of long-term used antipsychotics for behavioural symptoms in individuals with intellectual disability. J Intellect Disabil Res 2014; 58: 7183.
7 Joint Formulary Committee. British National Formulary (BNF) 67 (March–September 2014). Pharmacuetical Press, 2014.
8 Banerjee, S. The Use of Antipsychotic Medication for People with Dementia: Time for Action. Department of Health, 2009.
9 Radley, DC, Finkelstein, SN, Stafford, RS. Off-label prescribing among office-based physicians. Arch Intern Med 2006; 166: 1021–6.
10 Largent, EA, Miller, FG, Pearson, SD. Going off-label without venturing off-course. Arch Intern Med 2013; 169: 1745–7.
11 General Medical Council. Good Practice in Prescribing and Managing Medicines and Devices. GMC, 2013.
12 Menon, K, Baburaj, R, Bernard, S. Use of restraint for the management of challenging behaviour in children with intellectual disabilities. Adv Ment Heal Intellect Disabil 2012; 6: 6275.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
  • URL: /core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 6
Total number of PDF views: 122 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 495 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 2nd January 2018 - 17th July 2018. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Use of medication for challenging behaviour in people with intellectual disability

  • Gyles Glover (a1), Sarah Bernard (a2), David Branford (a3), Anthony Holland (a4) and Andre Strydom (a5)...
Submit a response

eLetters

No eLetters have been published for this article.

×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *