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Impact of a brief worry-based cognitive therapy group in psychosis: a study of feasibility and acceptability

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 April 2019

Helen Courtney
Affiliation:
Mental Health Recovery Teams, Solent NHS Trust, St Mary’s Community Health Campus, Milton Road, Portsmouth PO3 6AD, UK
Lucy White
Affiliation:
Mental Health Recovery Teams, Solent NHS Trust, St Mary’s Community Health Campus, Milton Road, Portsmouth PO3 6AD, UK
Thomas Richardson*
Affiliation:
Mental Health Recovery Teams, Solent NHS Trust, St Mary’s Community Health Campus, Milton Road, Portsmouth PO3 6AD, UK
Ben Dasyam
Affiliation:
Mental Health Recovery Teams, Solent NHS Trust, St Mary’s Community Health Campus, Milton Road, Portsmouth PO3 6AD, UK
Jo Tedbury
Affiliation:
Mental Health Recovery Teams, Solent NHS Trust, St Mary’s Community Health Campus, Milton Road, Portsmouth PO3 6AD, UK
Jane Butt
Affiliation:
Mental Health Recovery Teams, Solent NHS Trust, St Mary’s Community Health Campus, Milton Road, Portsmouth PO3 6AD, UK
*
*Corresponding author. Email: Thomas.Richardson@Solent.nhs.uk

Abstract

Previous research suggests that CBT focusing on worry in those with persecutory delusions reduces paranoia, severity of delusions and associated distress. This preliminary case series aimed to see whether it is feasible and acceptable to deliver worry-focused CBT in a group setting to those with psychosis. A secondary aim was to examine possible clinical changes. Two groups totalling 11 participants were run for seven sessions using the Worry Intervention Trial manual. Qualitative and quantitative data about the experience of being in the group was also collected via questionnaires, as was data on number of sessions attended. Measures were delivered pre- and post-group and at 3-month follow-up. These included a worry scale, a measure of delusional belief and associated distress and quality of life measures. Of the 11 participants who started the group, nine completed the group. Qualitative and quantitative feedback indicated that most of the participants found it acceptable and helpful, and that discussing these issues in a group setting was not only tolerable but often beneficial. Reliable Change Index indicated that 6/7 of the group members showed reliable reductions in their levels of worry post-group and 5/7 at follow-up. There were positive changes on other measures, which appeared to be more pronounced at follow-up. Delivering a worry intervention in a group format appears to be acceptable and feasible. Further research with a larger sample and control group is indicated to test the clinical effectiveness of this intervention.

Key learning aims

  1. (1) To understand the role of worry in psychosis.

  2. (2) To learn about the possible feasibility of working on worry in a group setting.

  3. (3) To be aware of potential clinical changes from the group.

  4. (4) To consider acceptability for participants of working on worries in a group setting.

Type
Original Research
Copyright
© British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies 2019 

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