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The impact of a CBT-based bipolar disorder psychoeducation group on views about diagnosis, perceived recovery, self-esteem and stigma

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 September 2019

Thomas Richardson*
Affiliation:
Mental Health Recovery Teams, Solent NHS Trust, St Mary’s Community Health Campus, Milton Road, Portsmouth POE 6AD, UK
Lucy White
Affiliation:
Mental Health Recovery Teams, Solent NHS Trust, St Mary’s Community Health Campus, Milton Road, Portsmouth POE 6AD, UK
*
*Corresponding author. Email: Thomas.Richardson@solent.nhs.uk

Abstract

Previous research has shown that psychoeducation for bipolar disorder (BD) improves symptoms and reduces relapse risk, but there is little research on how this impacts stigma, perceived recovery and views about diagnosis. The aim of this study was to explore whether a cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT)-based 12-week BD psychoeducation group conducted in a community mental health team for adults impacted perceived stigma, diagnosis-related self-esteem, recovery and views about diagnosis. The case series pre- and post-group had 23 participants across three groups. The Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire, views on Manic Depression Questionnaire, Bipolar Recovery Questionnaire and author-constructed questions were completed pre and post. Twenty participants completed the group. An intent-to-treat repeated measures multiple analysis of variance showed significantly improved perceived recovery and improvements in sense of control and understanding around their diagnosis. Other specific questions such as understanding of triggers and impact of thinking patterns also improved. However, there was no change in the perceived stigma or self-esteem associated with living with BD. CBT-based psychoeducation groups may help improve perceived recovery and factors such as sense of control in BD. However, there appears to be no impact on stigma and self-esteem, and the role of non-specific factors needs to be examined further.

Key learning aims

  1. (1) To raise awareness of the impact of stigma and self-esteem in bipolar disorder.

  2. (2) To understand the content and structure of CBT-based psychoeducation groups.

  3. (3) To consider the potential benefits of CBT-based psychoeducation groups beyond symptoms and relapse reduction on factors such as perceived recovery.

Type
Original Research
Copyright
© British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies 2019 

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