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Hope, happiness and home treatment: a study into patient satisfaction with being treated at home

  • Dieneke Hubbeling (a1) and Robert Bertram (a1)
Abstract
Aims and method

This study investigates patient satisfaction and levels of hope after receiving treatment from a home treatment team. It studies whether distributing questionnaires during the last visit increases the response rate, and explores whether patient satisfaction and levels of hope are associated with particular elements of the care received.

Results

Patients who answered the questionnaire tended to be satisfied. When forms were distributed during the last visit, the response rate increased to at least 64%. People with negative views were more likely to return the form by post. Patient satisfaction and levels of hope were associated with most elements of received care, and the resolution of problems was predictive of both satisfaction and increased hope in logistic regression.

Clinical implications

The distribution of service evaluation questionnaires during the last visit increased the response rate considerably. This study suggests that in order to improve services, it is important to focus on whether patients think their problems have been resolved.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Dieneke Hubbeling (dieneke@doctors.org.uk)
Footnotes
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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 2053-4868
  • EISSN: 2053-4876
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Hope, happiness and home treatment: a study into patient satisfaction with being treated at home

  • Dieneke Hubbeling (a1) and Robert Bertram (a1)
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