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Measuring clinically significant outcomes – LDQ, CORE-10 and SSQ as dimension measures of addiction

  • Duncan Raistrick (a1) (a2), Gillian Tober (a1) (a2), Jenny Sweetman (a1), Sally Unsworth (a1), Helen Crosby (a1) and Tom Evans (a1)...
Abstract
Aims and method

To determine values for reliable change and clinically significant change for the Leeds Dependence Questionnaire (LDQ) and Social Satisfaction Questionnaire (SSQ). The performance of these two measures with the Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation (CORE-10) as three dimension measures of addiction was then explored.

Results

The reliable change statistic for both LDQ and SSQ was ≥4; the cut-offs for clinically significant change were LDQ 410 males, ≤5 females, and SSQ ≥16. There was no overlap of 95% CIs for means by gender between ‘well-functioning’ and pre- and post-treatment populations.

Clinical implications

These data enable the measurement of clinically significant change using the LDQ and SSQ and add to the evidence for the performance of the LDQ, CORE-10 and SSQ as dimension measures of addiction. The CORE-10 and SSQ can be used as treatment outcome measures for mental health problems other than addiction.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Duncan Raistrick (d.raistrick@nhs.net)
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Declaration of interest

This paper is part of independent research funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) through the NIHR Collaboration in Leadership for Applied Health Research and Care for Leeds, York and Bradford. The views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the NHS, NIHR or the Department of Health. The NIHR had no role in the study design, collection, analysis or interpretation of the data, writing the presentation, or the decision to submit the poster for dissemination. The Local Research Ethics Committees reference: 10/H1306/38.

Footnotes
References
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Measuring clinically significant outcomes – LDQ, CORE-10 and SSQ as dimension measures of addiction

  • Duncan Raistrick (a1) (a2), Gillian Tober (a1) (a2), Jenny Sweetman (a1), Sally Unsworth (a1), Helen Crosby (a1) and Tom Evans (a1)...
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