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Teaching and learning the mental state exam in an integrated medical school. Part I: Student perceptions

  • Sarah Huline-Dickens (a1), Eithne Heffernan (a1), Paul Bradley (a1) and Lee Coombes (a1)
Abstract
Aims and method

To investigate medical students' performance at and perceptions of the mental state examination (MSE) at a medical school with a modern integrated curriculum. We undertook an evaluative case study comprising a survey and analysis of performance data. The study is presented in two parts: part 1 discusses the students' perceptions of the MSE and the teaching, learning and practising of it.

Results

Most students in the study group considered the MSE an important examination in medicine. Other perceptions grouped in themes are presented. Unsurprisingly, most students found psychiatric attachments the most useful part of the course for learning about the MSE. About a half of students had witnessed an MSE being undertaken in clinical practice.

Clinical implications

Although students appear to recognise the importance of this examination in medicine, the teaching and learning of it possibly needs greater emphasis in the undergraduate curriculum, and teaching and learning opportunities improved throughout the course.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Sarah Huline-Dickens (sarah.huline-dickens@pms.ac.uk)
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Declaration of interest

All authors are or have been part of the faculty of the Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry.

Footnotes
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 2053-4868
  • EISSN: 2053-4876
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Teaching and learning the mental state exam in an integrated medical school. Part I: Student perceptions

  • Sarah Huline-Dickens (a1), Eithne Heffernan (a1), Paul Bradley (a1) and Lee Coombes (a1)
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