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Antidepressant use in adults with intellectual disability

  • Prem R. Rai (a1) and Mike Kerr (a2)
Abstract
Aims and method

To study the use of antidepressants in adults with intellectual disability, focusing on medication type, indication, retention and clinical outcome. Case notes of all service users in a learning disability service were hand-searched to identify antidepressant usage, and those who had been treated with antidepressants and in whom at least 1 year of follow-up was possible were included in the study.

Results

A total of 241 treatment episodes were identified. The rates of positive outcome in terms of clinical improvement at 6 weeks, 6 months and 12 months were 49.4%, 48.1% and 49% respectively, and only 29 (12%) episodes of side-effects had been noted.

Clinical implications

Antidepressants are commonly prescribed in adults with intellectual disability. Approximately half did well in terms of clinical improvement.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Prem R. Rai (premrai50@hotmail.com)
Footnotes
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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 1758-3209
  • EISSN: 1758-3217
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Antidepressant use in adults with intellectual disability

  • Prem R. Rai (a1) and Mike Kerr (a2)
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