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Assessments for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: use of objective measurements

  • Carsten Vogt (a1) and Amirreza Shameli (a1)
Abstract
Aims and method

To appraise the value of additional information from objective measurements (QbTest system) in the clinical assessment of children and adolescents with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Two groups of ADHD assessments were compared. In the first group, assessments were undertaken without objective measures, whereas in the second group objective measures were added to the assessment. Practice outcomes were followed up over 1 year.

Results

Objective measures improve differentiating between ADHD and other conditions whose symptoms are known to overlap with ADHD. Objective measurements reduce the risk of unidentified ADHD (P < 0.0035) as measured by subsequent rates of revised diagnosis over a 12-month period.

Clinical implications

Introducing objective measurements into the clinical assessment of ADHD provides an increased robustness of the clinical diagnosis strengthening clinical decisions for treatment interventions.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Carsten Vogt (carsten.vogt@berkshire.nhs.uk)
Footnotes
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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 1758-3209
  • EISSN: 1758-3217
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Assessments for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: use of objective measurements

  • Carsten Vogt (a1) and Amirreza Shameli (a1)
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