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Bridging the gap between risk and recovery: a human needs approach

  • Ashimesh Roychowdhury (a1)
Summary

There is an inexorable drive in psychiatric services in the UK, including forensic services, towards organising and delivering care based on the principles of the recovery model. Hence recovery, and its subjective and objective measures, is the goal of these services and the standard by which the quality of the service is evaluated. At the same time, all psychiatric services are expected to practise evidence-based risk assessment and management practices and can be subject to severe criticism or sanctions if they do not do so. In this paper I set out the view that the values that underlie the recovery approach and the clinical risk assessment approach appear to be polar opposites. However, an understanding of human behaviour using a humanneeds model is an explanatory paradigm that underlies both the recovery model and the understanding of risk behaviour, and can thus unify these two approaches. Therefore a more explicit integration of this model into forensic care would be beneficial and there should be more research directed to the correlates of recovery-oriented measures and risk-related measures.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
Ashimesh Roychowdhury (aroychowdhury@standrew.co.uk)
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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 1758-3209
  • EISSN: 1758-3217
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Bridging the gap between risk and recovery: a human needs approach

  • Ashimesh Roychowdhury (a1)
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