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Comparison of emotional intelligence between psychiatrists and surgeons

  • Clive Stanton (a1), Faisil Nasim Sethi (a2), Oliver Dale (a3), Michael Phelan (a3), James Theodore Laban (a4) and Joseph Eliahoo (a5)...
Abstract
Aims and method

A comparative analysis of emotional intelligence between psychiatrists and surgeons using the Bar-On Emotional Quotient Inventory (Bar-On EQ-i) validated assessment tool. Applied to psychiatrists and surgeons with postgraduate membership in Greater London.

Results

A total of 148 individuals were recruited. The median scores for Total EQ scores were average, with no difference in Total EQ between psychiatrists and surgeons (P = 0.872). Psychiatrists scored significantly higher in the subscales of emotional self-awareness (P = 0.002), empathy (P = 0.005), social responsibility (P = 0.04) and impulse control (P = 0.011). Surgeons scored significantly higher in the subscales of self-regard (P = 0.005), stress tolerance (P < 0.0001) and optimism (P = 0.009).

Clinical implications

There are significant differences between psychiatrists and surgeons in the component factors that make up the Total EQ score. They seemingly correspond with widely held perceptions.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Clive Stanton (clivestanton@doctors.org.uk)
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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 1758-3209
  • EISSN: 1758-3217
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Comparison of emotional intelligence between psychiatrists and surgeons

  • Clive Stanton (a1), Faisil Nasim Sethi (a2), Oliver Dale (a3), Michael Phelan (a3), James Theodore Laban (a4) and Joseph Eliahoo (a5)...
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