Skip to main content
×
×
Home

Contingency management: what it is and why psychiatrists should want to use it

  • Nancy M. Petry (a1)
Summary

Contingency management is a highly effective treatment for substance use and related disorders. However, few psychiatrists are familiar with this intervention or its application to a range of patient behaviours. This paper describes contingency management and evidence of its efficacy for reducing drug use. It then details areas in which contingency management interventions can be applied in the context of psychiatric treatments more generally, including increasing abstinence in individuals with dual diagnoses, encouraging attendance in mental health treatment settings, enhancing adherence to psychiatric medications, reducing weight, and improving exercise. Greater awareness and use of contingency management in practice may improve outcomes across a range of mental health and related conditions.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Contingency management: what it is and why psychiatrists should want to use it
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Contingency management: what it is and why psychiatrists should want to use it
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Contingency management: what it is and why psychiatrists should want to use it
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Nancy Petry (npetry@uchc.edu)
Footnotes
Hide All

Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
Hide All
1 Lussier, JP, Heil, SH, Mongeon, JA, Badger, GJ, Higgins, ST. A meta-analysis of voucher-based reinforcement therapy for substance use disorders. Addiction 2006; 101: 192203.
2 Higgins, ST, Budney, AJ, Bickel, WK, Foerg, FE, Donham, R, Badger, GJ. Incentives improve outcome in outpatient behavioral treatment of cocaine dependence. Arch Gen Psychiatry 1994; 51: 568–76.
3 Petry, NM, Peirce, JM, Stitzer, ML, Blaine, J, Roll, JM, Cohen, A, et al. Effect of prize-based incentives on outcomes in stimulant abusers in outpatient psychosocial treatment programs: A national drug abuse treatment clinical trials network study. Arch Gen Psychiatry 2005; 62: 1148–56.
4 Peirce, JM, Petry, NM, Stitzer, ML, Blaine, J, Kellogg, S, Satterfield, F, et al. Effects of lower-cost incentives on stimulant abstinence in methadone maintenance treatment: a National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network study. Arch Gen Psychiatry 2006; 63: 201–8.
5 Dutra, L, Stathopoulou, G, Basden, SL, Leyro, TM, Powers, MB, Otto, MW. A meta-analytic review of psychosocial interventions for substance use disorders. Am J Psychiatry 2008; 165: 179–87.
6 Benishek, LA, Kirby, KC, Dugosh, KL, Padovano, A. Beliefs about the empirical support of drug abuse treatment interventions: a survey of outpatient treatment providers. Drug Alcohol Depend 2010; 107: 202–8.
7 Ritter, A, Cameron, J. Australian clinician attitudes towards contingency management: comparing Down Under with America. Drug Alcohol Depend 2007; 87: 312–5.
8 Bellack, AS, Bennett, ME, Gearon, JS, Brown, CH, Yang, Y. A randomized clinical trial of a new behavioral treatment for drug abuse in people with severe and persistent mental illness. Arch Gen Psychiatry 2006; 63: 426–32.
9 Roll, JM, Higgins, ST, Steingard, S, McGinley, M. Use of monetary reinforcement to reduce the cigarette smoking of persons with schizophrenia: a feasibility study. Exp Clin Psychopharmacol 1998; 6: 157–61.
10 Rosen, MI, Dieckhaus, K, McMahon, TJ, Valdes, B, Petry, NM, Cramer, J, et al. Improved adherence with contingency management. AIDS Patient Care STDS 2007; 21: 3040.
11 Volpp, KG, John, LK, Troxel, AB, Norton, L, Fassbender, J, Loewenstein, G. Financial incentive-based approaches for weight loss: a randomized trial. JAMA 2008; 300: 2631–7.
12 Weinstock, J, Barry, D, Petry, NM. Exercise-related activities are associated with positive outcome in contingency management treatment for substance use disorders. Addict Behav 2008; 33: 1072–5.
13 Kellogg, SH, Burns, M, Coleman, P, Stitzer, M, Wale, JB, Kreek, MJ. Something of value: the introduction of contingency management interventions into the New York City Health and Hospital Addiction Treatment Service. J Subst Abuse Treat 2005; 28: 5765.
14 Lott, DC, Jencius, S. Effectiveness of very low-cost contingency management in a community adolescent treatment program. Drug Alcohol Depend 2009; 102: 162–5.
15 Petry, NM, Alessi, SM, Hanson, T, Sierra, S. Randomized trial of contingent prizes versus vouchers in cocaine-using methadone patients. J Consult Clin Psychol 2007; 75: 983–91.
16 Olmstead, TA, Petry, NM. The cost-effectiveness of prize-based and voucher-based contingency management in a population of cocaine- or opioid-dependent outpatients. Drug Alcohol Depend 2009; 102: 108–15.
17 Garcia-Rodriguez, O, Secades-Villa, R, Higgins, ST, Fernandez-Hermida, JR, Carballo, JL. Financing a voucher program for cocaine abusers through community donations in Spain. J Appl Behav Anal 2008; 41: 623–8.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 1758-3209
  • EISSN: 1758-3217
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 52 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 173 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 2nd January 2018 - 23rd July 2018. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Contingency management: what it is and why psychiatrists should want to use it

  • Nancy M. Petry (a1)
Submit a response

eLetters

No eLetters have been published for this article.

×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *