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From DSM-IV to DSM-5: an interim report from a cultural psychiatry perspective

  • Neil Krishan Aggarwal (a1)
Summary

In July 2012, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) closed its final commenting period on draft criteria for the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), slated for publication in May 2013. DSM-5 raises familiar questions about the cultural assumptions of proposed diagnoses, the scientific evidence base of these criteria and their validity in international settings. I review these issues since the publication of DSM-IV. I assess the cultural validity of DSM-5 and suggest areas of improvement.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Neil Krishan Aggarwal (aggarwa@nyspi.columbia.edu)
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Declaration of interest

N.K.A. is an advisor to the DSM-5 Gender and Cross-Cultural Issues Study Group. He was also a study clinician for a DSM-5 field trial.

Footnotes
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 1758-3209
  • EISSN: 1758-3217
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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From DSM-IV to DSM-5: an interim report from a cultural psychiatry perspective

  • Neil Krishan Aggarwal (a1)
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