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Healthy brain ageing: the new concept of motivational reserve

  • Andreas Maercker (a1) and Simon Forstmeier (a2)
Summary

Various research approaches try to solve the puzzles related to dementia or healthy brain ageing. Neurogenetic, neuroimaging and neuropharmacological research are the most visible of these. Psychological research in dementia has been instrumental in improving familial or institutional care. However, it has not been regarded as basic research. Recent psychological research into the mechanisms of co-forming or shaping the clinical presentation of dementias can be counted as truly basic research. The ‘cognitive or brain reserve’ concept has been fruitful in implementing psychological knowledge on plasticity factors in dementia. The new concept of ‘motivational reserve capacity’ extends these psychological concepts. In particular, it provides a basis for integrating various findings on how lifestyle factors effectively shape clinical dementia presentations – or lead to healthy brain ageing.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Andreas Maercker (maercker@psychologie.uzh.ch)
Footnotes
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See commentary, pp. 178–179.

Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 1758-3209
  • EISSN: 1758-3217
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Healthy brain ageing: the new concept of motivational reserve

  • Andreas Maercker (a1) and Simon Forstmeier (a2)
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