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Importance of spiritual well-being in assessment of recovery: the Service-user Recovery Evaluation (SeRvE) scale

  • Joanna M. Barber (a1), Madeleine Parkes (a1), Helen Parsons (a2) and Christopher C. H. Cook (a3)
Abstract
Aims and method

To develop a self-report questionnaire to measure mental health recovery from the service user viewpoint. Literature searches and scoping exercises indicated that psychological, social and spiritual issues should be included. The resultant provisional scale was completed by 107 service users.

Results

The provisional scale was shortened as a result of factor analysis. The finalised version was highly reliable (Cronbach's alpha 0.911) and valid, correlating significantly with an already established recovery scale. It contained nine recognisable subscales, the first two describing existential and religious well-being. Separate well-being and ill-being factors were also identified.

Clinical implications

An inclusive tool for service users' assessment of their own recovery, the Service User Recovery Evaluation (SeRvE) scale, has been validated. This can be used both as a research tool and clinically to monitor interventions. The importance of spiritual care for service users is highlighted.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Joanna Barber (Joanna.Barber@bsmhft.nhs.uk)
Footnotes
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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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Importance of spiritual well-being in assessment of recovery: the Service-user Recovery Evaluation (SeRvE) scale

  • Joanna M. Barber (a1), Madeleine Parkes (a1), Helen Parsons (a2) and Christopher C. H. Cook (a3)
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