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The Individual Recovery Outcomes Counter: preliminary validation of a personal recovery measure

  • Bridey Monger (a1) (a2), Scott M. Hardie (a1), Robin Ion (a1), Jane Cumming (a2) and Nigel Henderson (a2)...
Abstract
Aims and method

The Individual Recovery Outcomes Counter (I.ROC) is to date the only recovery outcomes instrument developed in Scotland. This paper describes the steps taken to initially assess its validity and reliability, including factorial analysis, internal consistency and a correlation benchmarking analysis.

Results

The I.ROC tool showed high internal consistency. Exploratory factor analysis indicated a two-factor structure comprising intrapersonal recovery (factor 1) and interpersonal recovery (factor 2), explaining between them over 50% of the variance in I.ROC scores. There were no redundant items and all loaded on at least one of the factors. The I.ROC significantly correlated with widely used existing instruments assessing both personal recovery and clinical outcomes.

Clinical implications

I.ROC is a valid and reliable measure of recovery in mental health, preferred by service users when compared with well-established instruments. It could be used in clinical settings to map individual recovery, providing feedback for service users and helping to assess service outcomes.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Scott M. Hardie (s.hardie@abertay.ac.uk)
Footnotes
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Declaration of interest

B.M., N.H. and J.C. are currently employed by Penumbra. R.I. and S.H. are currently employed by the University of Abertay and B.M. was employed by Abertay during the research.

Footnotes
References
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The Individual Recovery Outcomes Counter: preliminary validation of a personal recovery measure

  • Bridey Monger (a1) (a2), Scott M. Hardie (a1), Robin Ion (a1), Jane Cumming (a2) and Nigel Henderson (a2)...
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