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MAPPA and mental health — 10 years of controversy

  • Jessica Yakeley (a1), Richard Taylor (a2) and Angus Cameron (a3)
Summary

Multiagency public protection arrangements (MAPPAs) were established in England and Wales 10 years ago to oversee statutory arrangements for public protection by the identification, assessment and management of high-risk offenders. This article reviews MAPPAs' relationship with mental health services over the past decade. Despite areas of progress in the management of mentally ill offenders, inconsistent practice persists regarding issues of confidentiality and information-sharing between agencies, which calls for clearer and more consistent guidance from the Royal College of Psychiatrists, the Ministry of Justice and the Department of Health.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Jessica Yakeley (jyakeley@tavi-port.nhs.uk)
Footnotes
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Declaration of interest

All the authors have some involvement in MAPPA policy.

Footnotes
References
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1 Davies, N, Hill, A. News of the World targeted phone of Sarah Payne's mother. Guardian 2011; 28 July (http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2011/jul/28/phone-hacking-sarah-payne).
2 National Offender Management Service Public Protection Unit. MAPPA Guidance 2009, Version 3.0. National MAPPA Team, 2009 (http://www.plymouth.gov.uk/mappa_guidance_2007.pdf).
3 Kemshall, H, Mackenzie, G, Wood, J, Bailey, R, Yates, J. Strengthening Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements (MAPPAs). Home Office Development and Practice Report 45. Research, Development and Statistics Directorate, 2005.
4 Williams, L. Offender health and social care: a review of the evidence on inter-agency collaboration. Health Soc Care Community 2009; 17: 573–80.
5 Young, S, Gudjonsson, GH, Needham-Bennett, H. Multi-agency public protection panels for dangerous offenders: one London forensic team's experience. J Forens Psychiatry Psychol 2005; 16: 312–27.
6 Kemshall, H. Working with sex offenders in a climate of public blame and anxiety: how to make defensible decisions for risk. J Sexual Aggression 2009; 15: 331–43.
7 Royal College of Psychiatrists. Good Psychiatric Practice: Confidentiality and Information Sharing (2nd edition) (College Report CR160). Royal College of Psychiatrists, 2010.
8 Ministry of Justice National Offender Management Service. Guidance for Working with MAPPA and Mentally Disordered Offenders. Ministry of Justice, 2010.
9 Buchanan, A, Grounds, A. Forensic psychiatry and public protection. Br J Psychiatry 2011; 198: 420–3.
10 Yakeley, J, Taylor, R. Multi-agency public protection arrangements: can we work with them? In Thinking about Antisocial Behaviour and Mental Health in the Community (eds Reiss, D, Rubitel, A). Karnac, 2011.
11 General Medical Council. Confidentiality. GMC Publications, 2009.
12 Department of Health. NHS Code of Practice on Confidentiality. Department of Health, 2003.
13 Department of Health. Confidentiality: NHS Code of Practice. Supplementary Guidance: Public Interest Disclosures. Department of Health, 2010.
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 1758-3209
  • EISSN: 1758-3217
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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MAPPA and mental health — 10 years of controversy

  • Jessica Yakeley (a1), Richard Taylor (a2) and Angus Cameron (a3)
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