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Open access community support groups for people with personality disorder: attendance and impact on use of other services

  • Steve Miller (a1) and Mike J. Crawford (a2)
Abstract
Aims and method

To describe a new open access community service for people with personality disorder and to explore interim service utilisation and outcomes. Routine data were analysed together with those from a cross-sectional survey.

Results

During the first 16 months of the service, 171 people attended, of whom 142 (83.0%) returned on at least one other occasion. The median number of attendances was seven (IQR = 3.0–22.0). Over 90% of responders to the survey met criteria for ‘probable personality disorder’ and levels of social dysfunction were high. Presentations to emergency services, contacts with other services and in-patient admissions were reduced. Social functioning improved.

Clinical implications

This service attracted a large number of people with significant health and social problems. Use of the service was associated with improved social functioning and reduced use of other services.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Steve Miller (Stephen.miller@swlstg-tr.nhs.uk)
Footnotes
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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 1758-3209
  • EISSN: 1758-3217
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Open access community support groups for people with personality disorder: attendance and impact on use of other services

  • Steve Miller (a1) and Mike J. Crawford (a2)
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