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Organisational processes around the investigation of serious events

  • Mark Cohen (a1)
Summary

This editorial focuses on a psychosocial application of psychoanalytic thinking to the processes which are in place to investigate serious events in psychiatric healthcare. It argues that the structures and processes in place can be understood with reference to organisational defences and to the ‘actor–network theory’. A common reason for such an investigation is a completed suicide. It is suggested that defensive processes may occur in response to the anxieties associated with serious events such as suicide and are of concern in terms of psychiatric care retaining a capacity for emotionally involved practice.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Mark Cohen (mark.cohen@ggc.scot.nhs.uk)
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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 1758-3209
  • EISSN: 1758-3217
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Organisational processes around the investigation of serious events

  • Mark Cohen (a1)
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