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Selecting staff for a personality disorder service: report from the field

  • Tennyson Lee (a1), Claire Ellingford (a2), Samantha Blackburn (a1), Elizabeth Bishop (a1), Nikolas Ragiadakos (a1), Patricia Elcock (a3) and Kamaldeep Bhui (a4) (a5)...
Abstract
Aims and method

To select staff for a personality disorder service by exposing applicants to anticipated challenges. Applicants took part in a role play, an unstructured group with fellow applicants and numbers of the interviewing panel, and a panel interview. A service user representative was involved from the initial planning stage.

Results

Multiple assessment methods enabled fine discrimination between applicants. Appointed staff said they felt the interviews were a valid test of required skills and have been well regarded by patients in the programme.

Clinical implications

Selecting staff for a personality disorder service benefits from using multiple interview methods. The service user representative and role-play actor can contribute crucially by representing the patient's perspective. Key domains to assess include the applicant's psychological qualities, psychiatric skills and ability to work in a team.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Tennyson Lee (tennyson.lee@eastlondon.nhs.uk)
Footnotes
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This paper was presented at the first National Personality Disorder Congress, Birmingham, 19–20 November 2009. A slideshow presentation delivered at the conference can be accessed at www.personalitydisorder.org.uk/archive/pd-congress-2009

Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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15 Bowers, L, Callaghan, P, Nijman, H, Paton, J, Carr-Walker, P, Allan, T, et al. The Right People for the Job: Choosing Staff that will Adjust Positively and Productively to Working in the New Personality Disorder Services. Report to the Home Office. City University, 2003 (http://www.iop.kcl.ac.uk/iopweb/blob/downloads/locator/l_436_Rightpeople.pdf).
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Selecting staff for a personality disorder service: report from the field

  • Tennyson Lee (a1), Claire Ellingford (a2), Samantha Blackburn (a1), Elizabeth Bishop (a1), Nikolas Ragiadakos (a1), Patricia Elcock (a3) and Kamaldeep Bhui (a4) (a5)...
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