Skip to main content
×
×
Home

Use of an online virtual environment in psychiatric problem-based learning

  • Jeremy Rampling (a1), Aileen O'Brien (a2), Keelyjo Hindhaugh (a1), Luke Woodham (a2) and Sheetal Kavia (a2)...
Abstract
Aims and method

To create a simulated patient with psychosis for psychiatric training within the online virtual environment of Second Life. After design and delivery of the scenario, medical students were asked to complete it and provide feedback.

Results

A total of 24 students tried the scenario and gave feedback via an online survey. The project had been offered to 150 students so the take up was low. The feedback was predominantly negative with 53 critical responses to 32 positive ones. The consensus was that the scenario was cumbersome, did not imitate real life and was of little educational value. Multimedia representations of psychotic symptoms were more positively received and there may be scope for further development.

Clinical implications

Interactive technology has a role in psychiatric education but we would not recommend the use of scenarios that rely predominantly on verbal communication within Second Life.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Use of an online virtual environment in psychiatric problem-based learning
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Use of an online virtual environment in psychiatric problem-based learning
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Use of an online virtual environment in psychiatric problem-based learning
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Jeremy Rampling (jeremy.rampling@swlstg-tr.nhs.uk)
Footnotes
Hide All

Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
Hide All
1 Stott, J. Medical education: learning the second way. BMJ 2007; 335: 1122.
2 CNN Edge of Discovery. Can Second Life help Teach Doctors to Treat Patients? Cable News Network, 2009 (http://edition.cnn.com/2009/TECH/03/30/doctors.second.life/cnnSTCText).
3 Wiecha, J, Heyden, R, Sternthal, E, Merialdi, M. Learning in a virtual world: experience with using second life for medical education. J Med Internet Res 2010; 12: e1.
4 Reznek, MA, Rawn, CL, Krumel, YM. Evaluation of the educational effectiveness of a virtual reality intravenous insertion simulator. Acad Emerg Med 2002; 9: 1319–25.
5 Joint Information Systems Committee. Problem-Based Learning in Virtual Interactive Worlds (PREVIEW) Final Report. JISC, 2008 (https://curve.coventry.ac.uk/cu/items/38cd8bee-ae1d-d50c-e9c0-a1dec639757a/1/PREVIEW%20Final%20Report.pdf).
6 Conradi, E, Kavia, S, Burden, D, Rice, A, Woodham, L, Beaumont, C, et al. Virtual patients in a virtual world: training paramedic students for practice. Med Teach 2009; 31: 713–20.
7 Toro-Troconis, M, Mellström, U, Partridge, M, Meeran, K, Barrett, M, Higham, J. Designing game-based learning activities for virtual patients in Second Life. J Cyber Rehabil 2008; 1: 225–38.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 1758-3209
  • EISSN: 1758-3217
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×
Type Description Title
PDF
Supplementary materials

Rampling et al. supplementary material
Supplementary Material

 PDF (1.2 MB)
1.2 MB
PDF
Supplementary materials

Rampling et al. supplementary material
Supplementary Material

 PDF (1.2 MB)
1.2 MB

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 23 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 67 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 2nd January 2018 - 21st July 2018. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Use of an online virtual environment in psychiatric problem-based learning

  • Jeremy Rampling (a1), Aileen O'Brien (a2), Keelyjo Hindhaugh (a1), Luke Woodham (a2) and Sheetal Kavia (a2)...
Submit a response

eLetters

No eLetters have been published for this article.

×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *