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Women in academic psychiatry

  • Rina Dutta (a1), Sarah L. Hawkes (a1), Amy C. Iversen (a1) and Louise Howard (a2)
Summary

Across academic medicine, including psychiatry, women are underrepresented in senior positions. Various reasons have been put forward, for example the lack of high-ranking female role models or mentors and a reduced rate of career progression for women compared with men. Mentoring has been shown to be a popular and feasible intervention which can improve the success of those perceived as disadvantaged groups (in this case women) by having an important impact on personal development, career guidance and research productivity.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
Rina Dutta (rina.2.dutta@kcl.ac.uk)
Footnotes
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These authors contributed equally to this work.

Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 1758-3209
  • EISSN: 1758-3217
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Women in academic psychiatry

  • Rina Dutta (a1), Sarah L. Hawkes (a1), Amy C. Iversen (a1) and Louise Howard (a2)
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