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Young people, self-harm and internet forums: Commentary on … Online discussion forums for young people who self-harm

  • John Powell (a1)
Summary

A generation of digital natives are living their lives in fundamentally different ways from previous generations. The rapid advance of the internet and mobile telephones, and the adoption of online social media, mean that substantial parts of the social lives of young people are played out in online settings. This has implications for how young people discuss and seek help for mental health problems. This commentary discusses the role of online forums for young people who self-harm. Practitioners need to understand the potential harms and benefits, and explore how benefits can be harnessed and harms minimised.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
John Powell (john.powell@warwick.ac.uk)
Footnotes
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*

See original paper, pp. 364–368, this issue.

Declaration of interest

J.P. is the part-time Clinical Director of NHS Choices.

Footnotes
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 1758-3209
  • EISSN: 1758-3217
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Young people, self-harm and internet forums: Commentary on … Online discussion forums for young people who self-harm

  • John Powell (a1)
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