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Abstract Solvers for Computing Cautious Consequences of ASP programs

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 September 2019


GIOVANNI AMENDOLA
Affiliation:
University of Calabria, Italy (e-mails: amendola@mat.unical.it, dodaro@mat.unical.it)
CARMINE DODARO
Affiliation:
University of Calabria, Italy (e-mails: amendola@mat.unical.it, dodaro@mat.unical.it)
MARCO MARATEA
Affiliation:
University of Genoa, Italy (e-mail: marco@dibris.unige.it)

Abstract

Abstract solvers are a method to formally analyze algorithms that have been profitably used for describing, comparing and composing solving techniques in various fields such as Propositional Satisfiability (SAT), Quantified SAT, Satisfiability Modulo Theories, Answer Set Programming (ASP), and Constraint ASP.

In this paper, we design, implement and test novel abstract solutions for cautious reasoning tasks in ASP. We show how to improve the current abstract solvers for cautious reasoning in ASP with new techniques borrowed from backbone computation in SAT, in order to design new solving algorithms. By doing so, we also formally show that the algorithms for solving cautious reasoning tasks in ASP are strongly related to those for computing backbones of Boolean formulas. We implement some of the new solutions in the ASP solver wasp and show that their performance are comparable to state-of-the-art solutions on the benchmark problems from the past ASP Competitions.


Type
Original Article
Copyright
© Cambridge University Press 2019 

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