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Inconsistency Proofs for ASP: The ASP - DRUPE Format

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 September 2019


MARIO ALVIANO
Affiliation:
University of Calabria, Italy (e-mail: mario@alviano.net)
CARMINE DODARO
Affiliation:
University of Calabria, Italy (e-mail: dodaro@mat.unical.it)
JOHANNES K. FICHTE
Affiliation:
TU Dresden, Germany (e-mail: johannes.fichte@tu-dresden.de)
MARKUS HECHER
Affiliation:
TU Wien, Austria (e-mail: hecher@dbai.tuwien.ac.at)
TOBIAS PHILIPP
Affiliation:
secunet Security Networks AG, Germany (e-mail: tobias.philipp@secunet.com)
JAKOB RATH
Affiliation:
TU Wien, Austria (e-mail: jakob.rath@tuwien.ac.at)

Abstract

Answer Set Programming (ASP) solvers are highly-tuned and complex procedures that implicitly solve the consistency problem, i.e., deciding whether a logic program admits an answer set. Verifying whether a claimed answer set is formally a correct answer set of the program can be decided in polynomial time for (normal) programs. However, it is far from immediate to verify whether a program that is claimed to be inconsistent, indeed does not admit any answer sets. In this paper, we address this problem and develop the new proof format ASP-DRUPE for propositional, disjunctive logic programs, including weight and choice rules. ASP-DRUPE is based on the Reverse Unit Propagation (RUP) format designed for Boolean satisfiability. We establish correctness of ASP-DRUPE and discuss how to integrate it into modern ASP solvers. Later, we provide an implementation of ASP-DRUPE into the wasp solver for normal logic programs.


Type
Original Article
Copyright
© Cambridge University Press 2019 

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