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WHAT DOES FIDO BELIEVE?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 June 2008

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Abstract

Lisa Bortolotti introduces the arguments about whether dogs can have beliefs.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Royal Institute of Philosophy 2008

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References

Further Reading

Colin, Allen and Marc, Bekoff, Species of Mind: The Philosophy and Biology of Cognitive Ethology, (MIT Press, 1997): chapter five.Google Scholar
Davidson, Donald, ‘Thought and Talk’, reprinted in Davidson, D., Inquiries into Truth and Interpretation, (Oxford Clarendon Press, 1984), 155-170.Google Scholar
Davidson, Donald, ‘What Thought Requires’, reprinted inDavidson, D., Problems of Rationality, (Oxford Clarendon Press, 2004), 135-150.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dennett, Daniel, ‘Do Animals have Beliefs?’ In Roitblat, Herbert L. and Meyer, Jean-Arcady (eds.) Comparative Approaches to Cognitive Science, (Cambridge (MA): MIT Press, 1995), 111-118.Google Scholar
Dickinson, Anthony and Balleine, Bernard(2000) ‘Causal cognition and goal-directed action’. In Heyes, C. & Huber, L. (Eds.), Evolution of cognition, (Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2000), 185-204.Google Scholar
MacIntyre, Alasdair C., Dependent Rational Animals: Why Human Beings Need the Virtues, (Open Court, 1999).Google Scholar
Mameli, Matteo and Bortolotti, Lisa‘Animal rights, animal minds, and human mind-reading’, Journal of Medical Ethics (2006) 32, 84-89.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stich, Stephen, ‘Do Animals Have Beliefs?’ Australasian Journal of Philosophy (1979) 57 (1).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tolman, Edward, Purposive behavior in animals and men (New York: Century, 1932).Google Scholar

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