Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) Sibling Pairs Data

  • Kathleen Mullan Harris (a1) (a2), Carolyn Tucker Halpern (a1) (a3), Brett C. Haberstick (a4) and Andrew Smolen (a4)

Abstract

This article describes the design and phenotype and genotype data available for sibling pairs with varying genetic relatedness in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health). Add Health is a nationally representative longitudinal study of over 20,000 adolescents in the United States in 1994–1995 who have been followed for 15 years into adulthood. The Add Health design included oversamples of more than 3,000 pairs of individuals with varying genetic resemblance, ranging from monozygotic twins, dizygotic twins, full siblings, half siblings, and unrelated siblings who were raised in the same household. Add Health sibling pairs are therefore nationally representative and followed longitudinally from early adolescence into adulthood with four in-home interviews during the period 1994–2009. Add Health has collected rich longitudinal social, behavioral, environmental, and biological data, as well as buccal cell DNA from all sample members, including sibling pairs. Add Health has an enlightened dissemination policy and to date has released phenotype and genotype data to more than 10,000 researchers in the scientific community.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) Sibling Pairs Data
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) Sibling Pairs Data
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) Sibling Pairs Data
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

address for correspondence: Kathleen Mullan Harris, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Carolina Population Center, CB# 8120 University Square, 123 W. Franklin Street, Chapel Hill, NC 27516-3997, USA. E-mail: kathie_harris@unc.edu

References

Hide All
Boardman, J. D., Domingue, B. W., & Fletcher, J. M. (2012). How social and genetic factors predict friendship networks. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 109, 1737717381.
Boardman, J. D., Saint Onge, J. M., Haberstick, B. C., Timberlake, D. S., & Hewitt, J. K. (2008). Do schools moderate the genetic determinants of smoking? Behavior Genetics, 38, 234246.
Cho, H., Guo, G., Iritani, J., & Hallfors, D. D. (2006). Genetic contribution to suicidal behaviors and associated risk factors among adolescents in the U.S. Prevention Science, 7, 303311.
Cruz, J. E., Emery, R. E., & Turkheimer, E. (2012). Peer network drinking predicts increased alcohol use from adolescence to early adulthood after controlling for genetic and share environmental selection. Developmental Psychology, 48, 13901402.
Daw, J., Shanahan, M., Harris, K. M., Smolen, A., Haberstick, B., & Boardman, J. D. (in press). Genetic sensitivity to peer behaviors: 5HTTLPR, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Journal of Health and Social Behavior.
Dawes, C. T., & Fowler, J. H. (2009). Partisanship, voting, and the dopamine D2 receptor gene. Journal of Politics, 71, 11571171.
De Neve, J. E. (2011). Functional polymorphism (5-HTLLPR) in the serotonin transporter gene is associated with subjective well-being: Evidence from a US nationally representative sample. Journal of Human Genetics, 56, 456459.
Fuemmeler, B. F., Agurs-Collins, T., McClernon, F. J., Kollins, S. H., Garrett, M. E., & Ashley-Koch, A. E. (2009). Interactions between genotype and depressive symptoms and obesity. Behavior Genetics, 39, 296305.
Guo, G. (2006). Genetic similarity shared by best friends among adolescents. Twin Research and Human Genetics, 9, 113121.
Guo, G., Cai, T., Guo, R., Wang, H., & Harris, K. M. (2010). The dopamine transporter gene, a spectrum of most common risky behaviors, and the legal status of the behaviors. PLoS ONE, 5, e9352.
Guo, G., Roettger, M. E., & Cai, T. (2008). The integration of genetic propensities into social-control models of delinquency and violence among male youths. American Sociological Review, 73, 543568.
Haberstick, B. C., Lessem, J. M., McQueen, M. B., Boardman, J. D., Hopfer, C. J., Smolen, A., & Hewitt, J. K. (2010). Stable genes and changing environments: Body mass index across adolescence and young adulthood. Behavior Genetics, 40, 495504.
Halpern, C. T., Kaestle, C. E., Guo, G., & Halfors, D. D. (2007). Gene-environment contributions to young adult sexual partnering. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 36, 543554.
Harden, K. P., Hill, J. E., Turkheimer, E., & Emery, R. E. (2008). Gene-environment correlation and interaction in peer effects on adolescent alcohol and tobacco use. Behavior Genetics, 38, 339347.
Harris, K. M. (2010). An integrative approach to health. Demography, 47, 122.
Harris, K. M. (2011). Design features of Add Health. Accessed on 1st August, 2012. Retrieved from http://www.cpc.unc.edu/projects/addhealth/data/guides/design%20paper%20WI-IV.pdf
Harris, K. M., Halpern, C. T., Smolen, A., & Haberstick, B. C. (2006). The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) twin data. Twin Research and Human Genetics, 9, 988997.
Hart, D., & Marmorstein, N. R. (2009). Neighborhoods and genes and everything in between: Understanding adolescent aggression in social and biological contexts. Development and Psychopathology, 21, 961973.
Heils, A., Teufel, A., Petri, S., Stober, G., Riederer, P., Bengel, D., & Lesch, K. P. (1996). Allelic variation of the human serotonin transporter gene expression. Journal of Neurochemistry, 66, 26212624.
Hu, X., Oroszi, G., Chun, J., Smith, T. L., Goldman, D., & Schuckit, M. A. (2005). An expanded evaluation of the relationship of four alleles to the level of response to alcohol and the alcoholism risk. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 29, 816.
McHale, S. M., Bissell, J., & Kim, J. Y. (2009). Sibling relationship, family, and genetic factors in sibling similarity in sexual risk. Journal of Family Psychology, 23, 562572.
Medland, S. E., & Neale, M. C. (2010). An integrated phenomic approach to multivariate allelic association. European Journal of Human Genetics, 18, 233239.
Nielsen, F. (2006). Achievement and ascription in educational attainment: Genetic and environmental influences on adolescent schooling. Social Forces, 85, 193216.
North, K. E., Graff, M., Adair, L. S., Lange, E. M., Lange, L. A., Guo, G., & Gordon-Larsen, P. (2010). Genetic epidemiology of body mass index and body mass change from adolescence to young adulthood. Obesity, 18, 14741476.
Samochowiec, J., Lesch, K. P., Rottmann, M., Smolka, M., Syagailo, Y. V., Okladnova, O., . . . Sander, T. (1999). Association of a regulatory polymorphism in the promoter region of the monoamine oxidase A gene with antisocial alcoholism. Psychiatry Research, 86, 6772.
Schulz-Heik, R. J., Shee, S. H., Silvern, L. E., Haberstick, B. C., Hopfer, C., Lessem, J. M., & Hewitt, J. K. (2010). The association between conduct problems and maltreatment: Testing genetic and environmental mediation. Behavior Genetics, 40, 338348.
Shanahan, M. J., Erickson, L. D., Vaisey, S., & Smolen, A. (2007). Helping relationships and genetic propensities: A combinatoric study of DRD2, mentoring, and educational continuation. Twin Research and Human Genetics, 10, 285298.
Shanahan, M. J., Vaisey, S., Erickson, L. D., & Smolen, A. (2008). Environmental contingencies and genetic propensities: Social capital, educational continuation, and dopamine receptor gene DRD2. American Journal of Sociology 114, S260S286.
Timberlake, D. S., Haberstick, B. C., Lessem, J. M., Smolen, A., Ehringer, M. A., Hopfer, C., & Hewitt, J. K. (2006). Association between the DAT1 9-repeat allele and reduced smoking in young adults from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Health Psychology, 25, 190197.
Vandenbergh, D. J., Perisco, A. M., Hawkins, A. L., Griffin, C. A., Li, X., Jabs, E. W., & Uhl, G. R. (1992). Human dopamine transporter gene (DAT1) maps to chromosome 5p15.3 and displays a VNTR. Genomics, 14, 11041106.
Van Tol, H. H., Wu, C. M., Guan, H. C., Ohara, K., Bunzow, J. R., Civelli, O., . . . Jovanovic, V. (1992). Multiple dopamine D4 receptor variants in the human population. Nature, 358, 149152.
Zeiger, J. S., Haberstick, B. C., Schlaepfer, I., Collins, A. C., Corley, R. P., Crowley, T. J., . . . Ehringer, M. A. (2008). The neuronal nicotinic receptor subunit genes (CHRNA6 and CHRNB3) are associated with subjective responses to tobacco. Human Molecular Genetics, 17, 724734.

Keywords

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed