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Proposing a Pedigree Risk Measurement Strategy: Capturing the Intergenerational Transmission of Antisocial Behavior in a Nationally Representative Sample of Adults

  • Joseph A. Schwartz (a1), Eric J. Connolly (a2), Kevin M. Beaver (a3) (a4), Joseph L. Nedelec (a5) and Michael G. Vaughn (a6)...

Abstract

An impressive literature has revealed that variation in virtually every measurable phenotype is the result of a combination of genetic and environmental influences. Based on these findings, studies that fail to use genetically informed modeling strategies risk model misspecification and biased parameter estimates. Twin- and adoption-based research designs have frequently been used to overcome this limitation. Despite the many advantages of such approaches, many available datasets do not contain samples of twins, siblings or adoptees, making it impossible to utilize these modeling strategies. The current study proposes a measurement strategy for estimating the intergenerational transmission of antisocial behavior (ASB) within a nationally representative sample of singletons using an extended pedigree risk approach that relies on information from first- and second-degree relatives. An evaluation of this approach revealed a pattern of findings that directly aligned with studies examining ASB using more traditional twin- and adoption-based research designs. While the proposed pedigree risk approach is not capable of effectively isolating genetic and environmental influences, this overall alignment in results provides tentative evidence suggesting that the proposed pedigree risk measure effectively captures genetic influences. Future replication studies are necessary as this observation remains preliminary. Whenever possible, more traditional quantitative genetic methodologies should be favored, but the presented strategy remains a viable alternative for more limited samples.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

address for correspondence: Joseph A. Schwartz, School of Criminology and Criminal Justice, University of Nebraska at Omaha, 310 Nebraska Hall, 901 N. 17th Street, Lincoln, NE 68588–0561, USA. E-mail: jaschwartz@unomaha.edu

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Proposing a Pedigree Risk Measurement Strategy: Capturing the Intergenerational Transmission of Antisocial Behavior in a Nationally Representative Sample of Adults

  • Joseph A. Schwartz (a1), Eric J. Connolly (a2), Kevin M. Beaver (a3) (a4), Joseph L. Nedelec (a5) and Michael G. Vaughn (a6)...

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