Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

University of Washington Twin Registry: Poised for the Next Generation of Twin Research

  • Eric Strachan (a1), Corinne Hunt (a1), Niloofar Afari (a2) (a3) (a4), Glen Duncan (a5), Carolyn Noonan (a6), Ellen Schur (a6), Nathaniel Watson (a7), Jack Goldberg (a5) (a8) (a9) and Dedra Buchwald (a6)...

Abstract

The University of Washington Twin Registry is a unique community-based registry of twin pairs who join specifically to participate in scientific research. It was founded in 2002 to serve as a resource for investigators throughout the scientific community. Current enrollment exceeds 7,200 pairs, and plans are in place to increase enrollment to 10,000 pairs by 2015. In addition to serving as a recruitment base for new research studies, the registry maintains extensive and continually expanding survey data on physical and mental health, as well as a biorepository that includes DNA from more than 8,800 individual twins. The registry is engaged in linking member data to birth records and to diagnostic and procedure variables for hospital-based care provided to members in Washington State. It also incorporates several innovative variables relevant to the built and social environments, which were created by geocoding twin addresses and linking the resulting coordinates to geospatial information systems databases. This combination of existing data and biospecimens, characterizing a group of twins who are willing to participate in research, is a valuable resource for the new wave of twin studies. These include ‘omics’, epigenetics, gene-by-environment interactions, and other novel methods to understand human health.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      University of Washington Twin Registry: Poised for the Next Generation of Twin Research
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      University of Washington Twin Registry: Poised for the Next Generation of Twin Research
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      University of Washington Twin Registry: Poised for the Next Generation of Twin Research
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

address for correspondence: Eric Strachan, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98101. E-mail: erstrach@uw.edu

References

Hide All
Afari, N., Noonan, C., Goldberg, J., Edwards, K., Gadepalli, K., Osterman, B.,. . . .Buchwald, D. (2006). University of Washington Twin Registry: Construction and characteristics of a community-based twin registry. Twin Research and Human Genetics, 9, 10231029.
Barker, D. J. (2007). The origins of the developmental origins theory. Journal of Internal Medicine, 261, 412417.
Eisen, S., Neuman, R., Goldberg, J., Rice, J., & True, W. (1989). Determining zygosity in the Vietnam Era Twin Registry: An approach using questionnaires. Clinical Genetics, 35, 423432.
Forsberg, L. A., Rasi, C., Razzaghian, H. R., Pakalapati, G., Waite, L., Thilbeault, K. S.,. . . Dumanski, J. P. (2012). Age-related somatic structural changes in the nuclear genome of human blood cells. American Journal of Human Genetics, 90, 217228.
MacGregor, A. J., Snieder, H., Schork, N. J., & Spector, T. D. (2000). Twins. Novel uses to study complex traits and genetic diseases. Trends in Genetics, 16, 131134.
Singh, G. K. (2003). Area deprivation and widening inequalities in US mortality, 19691998. American Journal of Public Health, 93, 11371143.
Torgersen, S. (1979). The determination of twin zygosity by means of a mailed questionnaire. Acta Geneticae Medicae et Gemellologia (Roma), 28, 225236.
van Dongen, J., Slagboom, P. E., Draisma, H. H., Martin, N. G., & Boomsma, D. I. (2012). The continuing value of twin studies in the omics era. Nature Reviews: Genetics, 13, 640653.
Watson, N. F., Harden, K. P., Buchwald, D., Vitiello, M. V., Pack, A. I., Weigle, D. S., & Goldberg, J. (2012). Sleep duration and body mass index in twins: A gene-environment interaction. Sleep, 35, 597603.

Keywords

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed