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Why different regions of the retina have different spectral sensitivities: A review of mechanisms and functional significance of intraretinal variability in spectral sensitivity in vertebrates

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 June 2011


S. E. TEMPLE
Affiliation:
Sensory Neurobiology Group, School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Queensland, Australia Ecology of Vision Laboratory, School of Biological Sciences, The University of Bristol, Bristol, UK
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Vision is used in nearly all aspects of animal behavior, from prey and predator detection to mate selection and parental care. However, the light environment typically is not uniform in every direction, and visual tasks may be specific to particular parts of an animal’s field of view. These spatial differences may explain the presence of several adaptations in the eyes of vertebrates that alter spectral sensitivity of the eye in different directions. Mechanisms that alter spectral sensitivity across the retina include (but are not limited to) variations in: corneal filters, oil droplets, macula lutea, tapeta, chromophore ratios, photoreceptor classes, and opsin expression. The resultant variations in spectral sensitivity across the retina are referred to as intraretinal variability in spectral sensitivity (IVSS). At first considered an obscure and rare phenomenon, it is becoming clear that IVSS is widespread among all vertebrates, and examples have been found from every major group. This review will describe the mechanisms mediating differences in spectral sensitivity, which are in general well understood, as well as explore the functional significance of intraretinal variability, which for the most part is unclear at best.


Type
Evolution and eye design
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2011

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Total number of HTML views: 9
Total number of PDF views: 216 *
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* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 3rd December 2020. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Hostname: page-component-b4dcdd7-nlmhz Total loading time: 1.015 Render date: 2020-12-03T16:55:08.863Z Query parameters: { "hasAccess": "0", "openAccess": "0", "isLogged": "0", "lang": "en" } Feature Flags last update: Thu Dec 03 2020 15:59:09 GMT+0000 (Coordinated Universal Time) Feature Flags: { "metrics": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "peerReview": true, "crossMark": true, "comments": true, "relatedCommentaries": true, "subject": true, "clr": false, "languageSwitch": true }

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Why different regions of the retina have different spectral sensitivities: A review of mechanisms and functional significance of intraretinal variability in spectral sensitivity in vertebrates
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Why different regions of the retina have different spectral sensitivities: A review of mechanisms and functional significance of intraretinal variability in spectral sensitivity in vertebrates
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Why different regions of the retina have different spectral sensitivities: A review of mechanisms and functional significance of intraretinal variability in spectral sensitivity in vertebrates
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