Skip to main content
×
Home

Patronage, Trust, and State Capacity: The Historical Trajectories of Clientelism

Abstract

What explains different levels of clientelism across countries? Why do some politicians deliver clientelistic goods to their electoral constituencies, and why do some voters demand them? This article focuses on the historical origins of trust in states and shows that they have a lasting impact on contemporary patterns of patronage. The shift to programmatic politics reflects a historical transition from personalized trust in politicians to trust in impersonal bureaucracies tasked by political parties to implement policy. Past experience with public bureaucracy informs the expectations of voters and parties regarding the performance of the state and its ability to provide public goods, which in turn shape the degree of clientelistic exchange across societies. To capture state capacity, the authors focus on the critical juncture before the expansion of women's suffrage, and use the ability of public bureaucracies to reduce infant mortality in the interwar period as a proxy for historical state capacity and as an instrument to predict trust. Macrodata from eightyeight electoral democracies and microdata from the most recent wave of the World Value Survey provide supportive evidence for the theory.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Patronage, Trust, and State Capacity
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Patronage, Trust, and State Capacity
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Patronage, Trust, and State Capacity
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
References
Hide All

* This article uses various data sources, one of which is a data set collected under the auspices of the Project on Democratic Accountability and Citizen-Politician Linkages around the World, implemented by a political science research group at Duke University, with Herbert Kitschelt, Department of Political Science, as principal investigator. Funding for the data collection was provided by the World Bank, Duke University, the Chilean Science Foundation (research grant directed by Juan Pablo Luna and David Altman, Catholic University of Chile). Previous versions of this article were presented at the American Political Science Association annual meetings in 2009 and 2016, the Midwest Political Science Association 2011, the Workshop on Democratic Accountability Strategies at Duke University, and at a Faculty Colloquium at Arizona State University. Haroon Atcha and Hao Wang provided research assistance. We thank James Adams, Sarah Brooks, Alberto Díaz-Cayeros, Martin Dimitrov, Herbert Kitschelt, Miki Kittilson, Charles Kurzman, Simon Rippon, Matt Singer, David Siroky, Cameron Thies, Michael Ward, Carolyn Warner, Brett Wilson, and three anonymous reviewers for their comments.

Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

World Politics
  • ISSN: 0043-8871
  • EISSN: 1086-3338
  • URL: /core/journals/world-politics
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×
Type Description Title
PDF
Supplementary Materials

Bustikova supplementary material
Bustikova supplementary material 1

 PDF (549 KB)
549 KB
WORD
Supplementary Materials

Bustikova supplementary material
Bustikova supplementary material 1

 Word (21 KB)
21 KB

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 3
Total number of PDF views: 569 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 1369 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 6th March 2017 - 19th November 2017. This data will be updated every 24 hours.