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The antioxidant properties of canthaxanthin and its potential effects in the poultry eggs and on embryonic development of the chick. Part 1.

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 July 2012

P.F. SURAI*
Affiliation:
Feed-Food Ltd, Dongola Road, Ayr, KA7 3BN, UK -- Scottish Agricultural College, Ayr, UK -- Sumy National Agrarian University, Sumy, Ukraine
*
Corresponding author: psurai@feedfood.co.uk
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Abstract

Among more than 750 known carotenoids, canthaxanthin (CX) has a special place as a carotenoid with proven antioxidant and other biologically-relevant functions. A substantial body of evidence indicates that CX possesses high antioxidant activity which has been shown in various in vitro model systems as well as in animal experiments in vivo. It seems likely that the highest protective effects of CX are seen under various stress conditions. This compound may be considered as an important element of the integrated antioxidant system of various tissues in the body, including chicken embryo development. A possibility of the recycling of vitamin E by carotenoids, including CX, is of interest for further investigation. Taken together, the data analysed in the paper clearly indicated that CX could provide benefits for animals, including in eggs and embryos as well as for chickens during early postnatal development. In particular, CX is well absorbed from the diet and effectively transferred to the egg yolk and developing embryo. It possesses high antioxidant activity and participates in building an effective antioxidant system of the body.

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Reviews
Copyright
Copyright © World's Poultry Science Association 2012

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